#MGoMoney: The Market & Your 401K/Investments

Submitted by UMProud on February 9th, 2018 at 4:49 PM

The Bear has is awake it seems and he is pissed off.

Are you worried about your investments, not worried at all, have already cashed out, or happy that you can buy more at lower prices?  Are you retired, close to retirement or a few years/decades away?  What kinds of funds do you own in your 401k?

 

Comments

Tampa 2

February 9th, 2018 at 4:54 PM ^

My 401k is doing great!! I am a couple decades away, but shit is looking good. Can turn bad quick though. Also happy to be getting extra hard earned money in my paycheck.

OrlanDumb2

February 9th, 2018 at 5:30 PM ^

I ignored the "he" because it is a typo. I'm going to assess your grammar now, using your first post as an example. 

"I am a couple decades away"

- Insert an "of" between "couple" and "decades".

"Can turn bad quick though"

-This is an improper sentence. It lacks a subject.

"Also happy to be getting extra hard earned money in my paycheck."

-You need to insert a dash in between "hard" and "earned". 

-This is also an improper sentence without a subject. You should change the beginning to, "I am also happy to be...".

 

Grammar Level: 4th Grade

Tampa 2

February 9th, 2018 at 6:13 PM ^

That wont stop guys like mb11. Once he sees no one responding to him, he'll log out and see that his posts are only visible to him when he's logged in, so he'll just create a new account.

And hey jackhammer way to feed that troll. That's what he is trying to make it look like. Mods can see where we are posting from and know im not him. Also i am not that dork you only live thrice guy either but whatever.

LSAClassOf2000

February 9th, 2018 at 8:15 PM ^

As Assistant to the Executive Mod, I can tell you without doubt that even in looking at your information and the bullshit e-mail address and all that, I have no clue what your IP address is or where the hell you are from, but if you'd like to post that information, please feel free to do so. 

huntmich

February 10th, 2018 at 1:43 PM ^

Every other internet forum has a block user option. Why hasn't this site done that? It's fucking 2018. This should be standard at this point. Instead we all have to get trolled by every douchebag who makes an account.

I'm leaving the site and withholding my donations until the moderators get this shit under control. It's not fucking worth it to deal with this stupid shit. I would recommend everyone do the same.

acnumber1

February 9th, 2018 at 6:29 PM ^

Can't believe I am logging in to make this comment, but can't help myself.

"Can turn bad quick though"

-This is an improper sentence. It lacks a subject.

...actually, the subject is an implied 'it/the market/the investment'. That part of the sentence is proper. However, the adjective 'quick' should be the adverb 'quickly' b/c it is modifying the verb 'to turn'.

Only making this comment to point out the dumbness of Orlan. Would never have thought twice about the OP's post.

rob f

February 10th, 2018 at 3:38 AM ^

My MGoPoints is doing great!! I am more than a couple hundred autonegs away from wiping out all Tampa 2's points (and the points of all his other accounts), but shit is looking good. He can turn good threads bad quick though. Also would be happy if I could turn my extra 70,000+ hard earned MGoPoints into cash or a paycheck.

ska4punkkid

February 9th, 2018 at 5:06 PM ^

man that's risky - I'd move at least 75% into bonds or something more stable if you're retiring. If you have $3 mill in retirement you can live off the stable 2-3% + pension + social security (it ain't gunna be around when i retire tho) while staying away from volatility

 

Just go into retirement completely debt free and you're golden

UMProud

February 9th, 2018 at 5:25 PM ^

I'm debt free now...won't have 2 million based on my computations but a nice enough egg to draw a salary from without hitting the principle.  I'm not worried about market fluctations since, even at retirement, I have a 10-30 year horizon.

BTW what's a pension?  Most of us don't work for the government.

Longballs Dong…

February 9th, 2018 at 5:26 PM ^

It all depends on your finances.  I'm about 10 years away from retiring in my low 50s (pending any changes) and I intend to keep all of my money in stocks.  If you need fixed income then you have to get out of stocks but if you have enough to be comfortable then you'll be fine.  I expect to live off of passive income streams and I'll have no debt.  I'll use cash on hand for big purchases but I don't intend to draw on it for monthly expenses, thus i intend to leave all of my liquid investments in stocks until I die and my children inherit it.  If you have $1M and no pension or other income, then yes, you need to protect what you have and should probably pull a lot of it out of stocks.  

evenyoubrutus

February 9th, 2018 at 6:44 PM ^

You guys are making this way too complicated. Just do what I did and you'll be fine. It's guaranteed to work every time. I'm even writing a book about it. It's called the Evenyoubrutus 4 step process to retirement planning.

1. Marry, a rich, successful sugar mama
2. Don't be a fucking asshole and cheat on her
3. Retire on your yacht together
4. Profit, or something

VinegarStrokes

February 9th, 2018 at 4:58 PM ^

as a PM and someone who manages a family office, my take is...this move was long overdue but is being exacerbated by the advent of volatily derivatives and program/algorithm trading. this move probably isn't complete yet but, if you have cash ear-marked for long term investments, start buying slowly...

Mfan88

February 9th, 2018 at 7:08 PM ^

Buffett’s 2013 Berkshire Hathaway letter to investors recommend a 90% stock index fund and 10% short term govt bonds for his wife’s investments should he pass. I have seen some Monte Carlo analysis where they look at this over a vast span of the market and compare it with other distributions (+/- at 10% increments from 100 to zero). Buffet hit the sweet spot but 80/20 & 70/30 aren’t bad either. The bigger risk is too much in short term bonds as those portfolios went bust in the analysis. Invest early and often and stay the course through retirement.