Very OT: Norwegians to build Ship Tunnel

Submitted by Ernis on April 19th, 2013 at 2:06 PM

Norway is going to build a shipping lane by tunneling under a mountain.

Completely off topic, but since this board is full of engineery-types and their fans, I thought it might be of some interest. Also to provide a light break in the ongoing manhunt coverage.

Ship canals have long been used to make journeys more direct and safer but the Stad peninsula is a mountainous divide, peaking at 645m, between the Norwegian Sea to the north and the North Sea to the south.

...

Instead of carving out a slice of the landscape for a canal, engineers will drill and blast through the rock at sea level before removing the dams so the sea can flood a 12m (39ft) deep channel for ships to travel in.

Link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22157079

Comments

4godkingandwol…

April 19th, 2013 at 3:17 PM ^

...of this blog as a blog for intelligent, rational people who happen to have am irrational devotion to the same university in all things, sports being the most obvious.

posts about engineering marvels that don't degrade to a stupid debate about corporate yibble yabble and government hoobalidoo are part of the reason why I like this blog.

quigley.blue

April 19th, 2013 at 2:25 PM ^

The displacement limit seems artificially low based on the dimensions of the tunnel itself.  Certainly the overhead clearance, beam, and draft numbers cited would afford passage to a larger ship, but there's no mention of curvature that would affect ship length, or not. 

I can only think of factors such as navigation outside of the tunnel itself that would limit a ship of greater than 16,000 tonnes.

MaizeAndBlueWahoo

April 19th, 2013 at 2:34 PM ^

I realize displacement and draft aren't exactly correlated, but they're somewhat related.  An Arleigh-Burke destroyer is roughly half that displacement (about 8,000 tons, highly dependent on fuel load) and draws about 32-ish feet.  No sane ship captain with that big a ship will go where they only have seven feet between hull and bottom, and then you have to consider tides, too.  Personally I'm actually surprised the tunnel could fit a 16,000 ton ship.  I'm sure they're thinking mostly flat-bottomed ships, but still.

stephenrjking

April 19th, 2013 at 11:00 PM ^

The great lakes seaway has a minimum draft of 27 feet, which lakers use every inch of when full. 32 isn't enough for the largest tankers or container ships, but even the 1000-footers (with a capacity of 50,000+ tons) on the lakes here could take that tunnel without issue.

How long is this supposed to be? That would be the biggest issue, I would think.

True Blue Grit

April 19th, 2013 at 2:27 PM ^

As a Naval Architect I can say that the dimensions indicate it's meant for not the largest ocean-going ships.  148 feet high and 115 ft. wide would definitely not accomodate most cruise ships and large tankers for example.  Also, with that width, they would probably need some sort of breakwaters to make sure there aren't signficant wave action coming through the tunnel that could cause the ship to hit the side by accident.  I'm also assuming that there are not significant tides there that could cause the depth of the water to vary too much. 

no joke its hoke

April 19th, 2013 at 2:41 PM ^

i think this is a awesome post. its the off season. we have seen some of the worse of te human race this week so its nice to read something pretty amazing that the human race is doing.

FreddieMercuryHayes

April 19th, 2013 at 2:44 PM ^

Cool!  I like tunnels!  I like boats!  Combining the two should be sweet!  But I imagine it's gonna be tough to hold your breath through the entire tunnel like is required in normal tunnel transit.

WMU81

April 20th, 2013 at 8:46 AM ^

Im 31 and have already had one. Really not as bad as everyone makes it out to be. I was out playing bball an hour after the procedure. And on top of that, my dog has anal glad issues.

This getting old shit sucks

quigley.blue

April 19th, 2013 at 2:49 PM ^

To make this less OT, we could point out that Michigan has a very strong Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering department.

Also, Mark Huyge, former football player, is a Naval Architect. 

I'm no expert in correlation and logic but seems to me that Norweigan shipping tunnels are directly related to our offensive line production this season.

Buck Killer

April 19th, 2013 at 3:53 PM ^

I built a huge sand castle when I was around 8. It had a moat around it and I bored a hole through the middle. I would float my plastic Indian canoes through it. If the Norwegians need help I have experience. #michigandifference