A Touch of Class. Michigan St vs Michigan 2012 post game sportsmanship.

Submitted by WingsNWolverines on August 21st, 2013 at 8:44 PM
This is a video I came across you tubing Michigan football games and highlights from last season. I have honestly never seen this video before until last night and it really made me proud seeing our guys come over to the Spartan sideline to shake hands. Very classy of Lewan to lead the way over there and shake Gholston's hand along with Cunningham and Maxwell. Really classy gesture by both teams. This is what B10 football is all about. Still want to beat the shit out of them this year though! Lol 10 DAYS BABY GO BLUE! http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0LoUx2nGTzg&feature=youtu.be&desktop_uri=%…

Comments

Bando Calrissian

August 21st, 2013 at 8:50 PM ^

You mean it's good to see them do what pretty much every Michigan team did at the end of every home game until five years ago, when the guys started making a beeline for the student section instead?

taistreetsmyhero

August 21st, 2013 at 11:08 PM ^

I find it funny b/c the idea of celebrating a win and ignoring the losers seems to me to go hand-in-hand with the older generation's sentiment that we baby people now and have an "everybody is a winner" mentality.

To me, older people should think like I do because they realize that the winner won and can do whatever they want and the loser lost so they have to take it like the losers that they are. Losing and feeling like shit is a rite of passage.

mgo한국

August 22nd, 2013 at 12:46 AM ^

Perhaps we have two views of the handshake: that it represents a show of respect for a formidable challenger / that it entails babying or consoling an enemy or loser.

Perhaps we have a generation which values the challenge and competition, and the life lessons gained by learning to handle both successes and failures and a generation that puts more value on the end result and possibly demonizes opponents.

Blue in Yarmouth

August 22nd, 2013 at 7:48 AM ^

at least to the part about not shaking hands after a game. I'm almost 40 years old and have played sports all my life and I have never put much stock in the post game handshake. I think it is a far better idea to have the handshaking done pregame, before any bad blood between the two teams. This would eliminate the potential for post-game brawls and allow the victors to celebrate in any manner the choose.

Being a hockey player I can tell you that there were many times following emotional games that brawls broke out during the post-game handhsake. I just don't see the point of it. It's forced and from personal experience I can tell you that no one that is actually involved in the handshaking really wants to be doing it. 

Players put everything they have into playing their respective sports and if you just won a hard fought game all you want to do is celebrate with your team/friends and if you lost, you just want to get the hell out of there. Having to shake hands the people you just did battle with is the last things you want to do. 

So for me...have the handshakes first if it is something that has to be done but don't force the players to shake eachothers hands after the game, it's beyond ridiculous.

Mabel Pines

August 22nd, 2013 at 8:13 AM ^

Stuff going on with sports these days. I have 3 kids. They handed out medals all the time when my kids were little. For participating. So much so that my kids didn't even care after a while. My daughter actually asked how she received a medal when her team never won a game. Now compare that to my sons ball game this summer. Last inning, score is 22-2, coach is sending them to steal home. Are we telling kids they are all great? Or destroy at all costs? I have no idea. Which is why I stress academics.

Section 1

August 22nd, 2013 at 9:23 AM ^

I am so glad that you wrote this, giving explicit voice to this point of view.  Because if, on my own, I had accused a generation of this sort of moral bankruptcy, I'd expect to get flamed.

I find it funny b/c the idea of celebrating a win and ignoring the losers seems to me to go hand-in-hand with the older generation's sentiment that we baby people now and have an "everybody is a winner" mentality.

To me, older people should think like I do because they realize that the winner won and can do whatever they want and the loser lost so they have to take it like the losers that they are. Losing and feeling like shit is a rite of passage. 

I gotta say; I appreciate the clarity in that sort of writing. 

But what an ugly prospect.  What a manifesto for a self-absorbed, self-interested, cellphone-video generation. 

I condemn the recent Michigan practice of running off to the student sections the moment the game ends.  There can be no mistaking; it makes Michigan look bad.  Like a bunch of self-absorbed punks.  Our rivals and opponents would rightly use it against us, as an exhibit of lousy character and a lack of sportsmanship.  It is an insult to the game, to run away the moment the clock runs out.

If Brady Hoke were a real heir to the Schembechler legacy (and he may be, I won't judge as yet), he'd put his foot down on this, and on things like Denard Robinson's "eating" gestures.

If the players want to sing The Victors with the band and the students in the northwest corner of the Stadium, that's fine.  After they shake hands with the opposition.  But better would be to walk off the field with the opponents in the spirit of sportsmanship.

Thanks to Bando in particular for his post in this thread.

taistreetsmyhero

August 22nd, 2013 at 11:00 AM ^

We're the YOLO generation. When we fulfill our best intentions, we're all about having those rare experiences in life where you feel fully uninhibited joy--like animalistic, raw happiness. These are feelings that you can't contrive.

We don't have some switch that you can flip between ZOMGGGG!!!!ADGALSDG;ALKDJGA;G to "Wow, really tough game [losing player], see you next year," and then back to ZOMGGGGG!!!!AAS;DFLKAJSDG;LKSJDG;ALKJG.

If you think showing that kind of passion is immature, then I feel sorry for you. There is no greater feeling. And as a fan, you get to feel those feelings. You have no arbitrary "sportsmanship" requirements. I'd say that the players deserve to show some raw emotions a lot more than fans.

It's the same reason why I hate the excessive celebration penalties in sports. If you just made a 360 reverse windmall slam in a basketball game, you've done something amazing. As a fan, I get to go ZOMGGGGGADSF;LKASJDF;ALKSDJFA;SLKDFJA;SLDGJKAS;LDKGJ. So why shouldn't the player?

In my mind, the only place "respect" is required in sports is respect for safety. There's no place for intentional or reckless plays that put other players in danger. And if you think that the type of sports environment I advocate would make players more indignant and more likely to play recklessly, then I say those players don't belong in the game. I'll steal some ideas from the older generation:  If you can't take the heat, get the fuck out of the kitchen. Aww your feelings hurt? Grow a pair and take it like a man.

---------------------

Now, where my generation gets off track is in trying to contrive these moments of passion and convince other people that they're having the time of their lives. And also, we seem to be convinced that the only way to experience joy is through binge drinking and molly--which, I mean it definitely brings you closer to animalistic urges--but at the same time is stupid. But this is all a different conversation...

Wolverine Devotee

August 22nd, 2013 at 11:10 AM ^

Since it has taken place 14 times at Michigan Stadium since Hoke was hired (14-0), I don't think he has a problem with it. 

And anyone who "condemns" the eating celebration, nobody is getting penalized for it. Be thankful our players don't want to swag out Canes-style

 

Section 1

August 22nd, 2013 at 12:06 PM ^

First, let's remember that this business of saluting the student sections is nothing unique, there is no Michigan tradition associated with it.  Some other schools (a lot of other schools) do it; as much as anything, it is much more of a Notre Dame tradition/trademark.  So you got that going for you.  Congratulations.

Second, if anyone wants to worship that photo of Denard sitting on the Stadium wall, there is no reason that he can't do that after shaking hands at midfield.  That's been mentioned already in this thread.

Third, I'd bet that if Bo Schembechler were alive, he'd bench Denard for doing that eating thing.  Denard would have never thought of doing it; if he did, once would all that have been necessary before he knew not to do it again.  I don't care if it didn't warrant a penalty.  It is actually a close call on whether it could have been be a penalty.  Rule 9, Section 2, Article 1, rule (a)(1)(d) says that an unsportsmanlike penalty can be called for:

(d) Any delayed, excessive, prolonged or choreographed act by which

a player (or players) attempts to focus attention upon himself (or

themselves). 

So it is a stupid risk in a big game for any player to risk a violation simply to engage in the "eating" motion.

Fourth, I am always thankful whenever we don't do things like Miami (or Notre Dame, for that matter).

Finally, my default view towards Brady Hoke is to give him a fair shake and the benefit of any doubt.  I want to support him and see him succeed.  That doesn't mean he doesn't have to answer any questions.  And this decline in Michigan football sportsmanship, and the sorry spectacle of Denard Robinson's "eating" routine, and Hoke's own inexplicable departure from the field at Ohio State without shaking Urban Meyer's hand prompts several hard questions.

 

Section 1

August 22nd, 2013 at 1:15 PM ^

In Michigan Stadium, Hoke is escorted by police.

And Greg Mattison made his way over to Urban Meyer and exchanged greetings with his old boss at that very time.

When you say something like "inbreds," I think about what a conversation-ender that is, if and when an opposition fan makes an equivalent statement about Michigan fans.

I don't know; if there is a good explanation from Hoke, I am ready to hear it.  It's not a real big deal, so after the initial argument at that time, I haven't given it a whole lot more thought.  Has there ever been any good explanation?

MCalibur

August 22nd, 2013 at 10:44 AM ^

Losing its values in relation to what, the 60's? Was it really better back then? For some, maybe...value discussions are tricky, man.

I think I know what  you mean but kids these days have parents these days who were raised by grandparents these days. Whatever changes we observe didn't happen overnight. Socialization is a learned thing. Kids these days didnt just decide to be this way spontaneuosly in unison...

jsquigg

August 22nd, 2013 at 2:49 PM ^

Yeah, this generation is "losing it's values."  Remember the good old days when blacks couldn't own property and women knew their place.  Give me a break about values.  Perhaps you think people should echo the manners or the civility of the past, but there have always been people who had different values and there have always been people who didn't give a shit in all walks of life.  Spare me your judgement of "this generation."

ontarioblue

August 22nd, 2013 at 7:44 AM ^

It was the one thing I hoped Hoke would have changed immediately.  Shake hands then celebrate.  I guess under RR the culture of losing was so entrenched that when they actually won they were so surprised that they forgot what to do. Time to re-establish culture of winning and the class that we had always showed before.

 

MCalibur

August 22nd, 2013 at 10:46 AM ^

I hear you Bando but I think this is going a little far. If dudes authentically want to shake hands have at it, its a nice thing to see for sure. But if they want to go celebrate, I like to see that too. I don't think a uniform response is warranted or necessaryat all. I dont think it indicates any lack of values or sportsmanship whatsoever. Actually I think it would look bad for guys to fake it if they dont genuinely feel like it, particularly in the immediate aftermath of a game. Post game interviews? Different story. Values are a dicey, dicey subject and its often best to let people "do unto others." A token handshake after a tough loss doesn't do anyone any good.

I'm curious what you think of the whole "Ohio" thing, is that respectful? Or the Little Brother thing, I may be wrong but I dont remeber Lloyd coming down on Hart particularly hard or at all even. How 'bout being  a jerk to sideline reporters?

 

Section 1

August 22nd, 2013 at 12:00 PM ^

And nobody ever complained about spontaneous celebrations when big games were won in the last second as the clock expired.  No one thought anything of it.  I know I didn't.

There is a qualitative difference now; where the clock in a game that is not in doubt runs down, and most of the team sprints toward Section 30 or thereabouts when the clock gets to 0:00.  Not all of them do.  The players who don't are the ones who effectively prevent Michigan from being ridiculed by opponents as being complete assholes.  But they also highlight the fact that some Michigan players immediately ran to the north endzone.

 

M-Wolverine

August 22nd, 2013 at 3:55 PM ^

There has never been any tradition in college football of going to the center of the field and congratulating each other. Heck, 3/4 of the opposing team is already up the tunnel if they lost the game by the time Michigan hits midfield anyway. Some players and personnel mill around if they know someone on the other team and are looking out for them.  Or cross someone and offer them a good game for some some reason. But it's not hockey where they line up and shake hands.

Which is stupid anyway because you've spent hours trying to beat the hell out of each other and probably at least really dislike that dude, and you're shaking hands with a complete lack of sincerity. It's disingenious fake feel good crap.

And I don't think I'd qualify as in the "younger generation."  I could just always see the hypocrisy in it, even as a kid.

TIMMMAAY

August 22nd, 2013 at 7:24 PM ^

I don't see it as "lacking sincerity" at all. You're acknowledging your opponent and the effort they put forth, win or lose. I have always had an appreciation for it, and good sportsmanship in general. That's how I expect my child to behave, and hope he feels the same. 

I gotta say, reading everyone's comments here is really discouraging. But hey, different strokes I guess. 

denardogasm

August 21st, 2013 at 9:02 PM ^

I have to say though it was pretty satisfying to see Lewan just walk right past Dantonio.  And I had no recollection of it being that dark at the end of the game.. Weird

bluebyyou

August 21st, 2013 at 9:18 PM ^

From what I have observed, the players, the real warriors, get it.  Both sides play their guts out.  There is mutual respect.  Some of this has been very obvious with our bball games with Ohio....players helping each other up as the game gets near the end.  Burke vs Craft....huge respect.

Interesting video...thanks for sharing.

DonAZ

August 21st, 2013 at 9:34 PM ^

It's a show of maturity.  It's perfectly in keeping with the character Hoke is seeking to shape for the program.  Good for both sides to show grace ... in victory and defeat.