Shea Patterson Drafted

Submitted by Expert In Bird Law on June 6th, 2018 at 7:42 PM

Shea Patterson was drafted today by the Texas Rangers in the 39th round of the MLB draft as a 3rd baseman despite not playing baseball since his JR year of high school. The end of the draft always gets a little funky.

 

Im guessing he has some connection to the franchise but did not find anything

 

https://www.freep.com/story/sports/college/university-michigan/2018/06/06/michigan-shea-patterson-mlb-draft/679393002/

 

 

Comments

Michwolv9

June 6th, 2018 at 7:47 PM ^

Are situations like theese common in the mlb? I can’t see the value in drafting a kid who hasent played since highschool even if he’s a d1 quarterback 

JonnyHintz

June 6th, 2018 at 8:04 PM ^

Extremely common. It’s a 40 round draft. Towards the end it always seems like GMs let their 8 year old grandson pick somebody. 

Odds are anyone you drafted in that position aren’t going to sign anyway, and even in the incredibly unlikely event that they do sign, they’re probably not very good anyway.

 

Sleepy

June 7th, 2018 at 9:29 AM ^

At any given point, each franchise prolly has a dozen-ish kids in their system who are legit MLB prospects.  And those kids need to play in minor league games...

AAA

AA

A+

A

Short Season

Rookie (anywhere from two to four teams)

...and each of those teams needs 25-ish players.  Meaning each team has at least 150 minor league players who exist solely so that the dozen-ish with an MLB future can play competitive baseball every day.  Hence the 40 round draft.

EJG

June 8th, 2018 at 3:59 PM ^

They usually carry another 4 or 5 kids on IR or Designated for Assignment at each level.  The average organization carries about 165 players.  The actual number that will eventually play in the majors is almost exactly 10% or 16-17 per organization.  There was a great program on MLB Network called "The Ten Percent."  It aired last year and focused on the SF Giants organization.  It is a must see for anyone who doesn't appreciate the time, effort and skill involved in becoming a major league ballplayer.

Perkis-Size Me

June 6th, 2018 at 8:29 PM ^

There’s not a whole lot for GMs to lose in these way late rounds anyway. In these rounds, there are no signing bonuses, salaries usually aren’t more than 2k a month if that, and these guys hardly ever make it past single or double a. Much less ever get called up to the big leagues. One of my buddies got drafted by the Mariners around the fortieth round five to six years ago. He did make it up to AA before hanging up the cleats, but he told me that for four years his life was living in the middle of buttfuck nowhere most of the year, living in motels, countless hours riding the bus to and from games, and memorizing the 2 for $20 menu at AppleBees because if he wanted to go out for dinner that was as much as he could afford.

You never really consider a pick to be worthless, but a pick near the 40th round is as close as it gets.

ScruffyTheJanitor

June 7th, 2018 at 9:08 AM ^

The Angels drafted Torii Hunter Jr.  in the 23rd couple years back, when he was playing *football* for Notre Dame.  He surprised a lot of people by switching to Baseball full time, and surprised everyone even more by being a pretty darn good prospect, especially considering he only played like 20 baseball games for the Irish in four years. 

Knight

June 6th, 2018 at 8:52 PM ^

Not at all. Oklahoma's QB Kyler Murray was the 9th overall pick and has an actual legitimate future in pro baseball but will still be suiting up to play for the Sooners this season. The late rounds of the MLB draft are basically throw-away picks, and it is very common for notable non-baseball playing amateur athletes to get selected along with the sons of team coaches/employees and former players. Most of those picks will never play pro ball, or if they do, not above the very lowest minor league levels or after getting a few years of development in college and re-entering the draft.  

DrMantisToboggan

June 6th, 2018 at 8:49 PM ^

Since this move is silly and my question does not warrant a separate thread, I'll ask it here: will the MGoFeed twitter eventually pick back up so I can be notified of blog posts via Twitter notifications? Or will a new Twitter account have to be set up for the new site?

slimj091

June 6th, 2018 at 11:49 PM ^

Maybe it's because I don't follow baseball that closely, But shouldn't an athlete declare for a draft before he can be drafted? Or is the MLB draft pretty much a bunch of dudes throwing darts at pages of a phone book taped up on a giant wall?

JVANVEEL

June 7th, 2018 at 7:18 AM ^

The MLB draft is the wild west, anyone can be drafted as long as you meet the MLB eligibility standards.  Not 100% sure of the requirements, but something like this, being a senior in high school, GED and of age (Bryce Harper), or just finishing your third year in college.

Bryce Harper is an interesting story he was the national player of the year his sophomore and junior year in high school. After his junior year he got his GED went and played at a junior college in what would have been his senior year in high school. This league used wood bats, and then was drafted #1.

Tom Snow

June 7th, 2018 at 10:33 AM ^

Definitely the latter. You meet a certain eligibility and then can be drafted, but you need to either sign with a team or you go back in the draft pool. Say a 18 year old gets drafted by the Padres in the 15th round. He can elect not to sign, and then he'd go back in the pool next year and hopefully improve his stock (and get more $$).