OT: Bud Selig Released a Statement

Submitted by Seth9 on June 3rd, 2010 at 3:00 PM

The Tigers radio broadcasters just said that Bud Selig released a statement. The important parts are that Selig is still reviewing whether the call can and should be reversed and will be consulting with various entities with regard to the issue, and that he will be reopening consideration as to whether instant replay should be expanded.

At least he hasn't closed the door, I suppose.

Comments

Space Coyote

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:26 PM ^

A man by the name of Tiger Woods in your sport, at least at one time, that helped significantly.  I know other sports have stars, but not many were as big as Tiger.  Tiger is equivalent to Gretzky or Jordan of his sport.  But yeah, he has done well making the PGA mean something, particularly for every Tourney Tiger is in.

France719

June 4th, 2010 at 1:49 PM ^

I have to say, at first I thought Goodell was an ass, just out to police the players and only interested in keeping the image of the league clean.  I have changed my mind though.  I think he is pushing the NFL along in the right direction (International games, 18 regular season games, changes to overtime, etc.)  Now he just has to get the ball really rolling on the new CBA.

Magnus

June 4th, 2010 at 2:02 PM ^

I think the NFL is the standard for how major sports leagues should be run.  There are some silly rules in place, but ultimately, football players are held accountable for their actions on and off the field.  I think that sets a good example for youth and America in general.  Tagliabue and Goodell have both done a good job, I think.

JeepinBen

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:16 PM ^

A 400% increase in revenue? That's something good. 

"Selig oversaw baseball through the 1994 strike, the introduction of the wild card, interleague play, and the merging of the National and American leagues under the Office of the Commissioner. He was instrumental in organizing the World Baseball Classic in 2006.[4] Selig also introduced revenue sharing.[5] He is credited for the financial turnaround of baseball during his tenure with a 400 percent increase in the revenue of MLB and annual record breaking attendance." (Wikipedia)

He hasn't done a great job with the on the field product (Roids, calling the all-star game, etc.) but I think that a 400% increase in revenue is a pretty good job by some one who works for the owners.

JeepinBen

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:29 PM ^

Or rejuvenated? 

I remember cheering Slamming Sammy Sosa in 1998, I was so depressed when McGwire hit that laser over the left field fence off of Steve Tracshel (sp?) and Sammy came in from the outfield to hug him. 

Are those memories tainted? Yes, but they were great at the time. I didnt have to look up any details about that play, and I was 10. 

People are quick to blame Selig, but not the cheating players themselves. Manny? He still has his own section in Dodger Stadium. McGwire? Now a hitting coach. Andy Pettit? Still pitching for the Yankees. And all of them could STILL be on HGH because - even though Selig has tried - MLB can't test for it. The MLB has the strongest players union of any sport, the NFL has a MUCH bigger drug problem than the MLB. Again, I'm not saying Selig was perfect... but i wouldnt say he was terrible either.

JeepinBen

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:40 PM ^

I'm pointing out that TONS of people cheated in baseball, and it sucks, and they still could be cheating. And guess what? They hit balls far and made millions for everyone involved. It totally sucks. But in 1998, when we didnt know they were cheating, it was awesome. 

And rather than Columbus and East Lansing, a better example would be the cheaters in Kentucky - who voted that they wouldn't mind cheating to get a national title. Or at USC who hopefully gets hammered tomorrow - but who's fans got to celebrate heismans and a national title anyway.

I'm not saying I want to cheat, or that it's good. I'm saying it sucks, and it happens, and blaming Selig for it is just stupid.

Wolverine318

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:51 PM ^

You had to be a complete moron to not know they were juiced even in 98. Heck anyone that has gone through DARE education in elementary school should be able to point out the physical symptoms of steroid abuse. That was also the point in time I took a complete haiutus from baseball as I couldn't respect a league that would allow rampant drug abuse just so it can earn another million in revenue. Selig knew and he was fine as long as the dollars rang in. It took congress for him to finally make somewhat of an effort to clean up the sport. He was completely complacent. Just like the yellow gutless bastard that he is.

JeepinBen

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:53 PM ^

I must have been a complete moron just like 98% of america. 

Especially the guys at S.I....

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/features/1998/sportsman/98large_cover/

And, to quote Bill Simmons:

"Mike Lupica's "Summer of '98: When Homers Flew, Records Fell, and Baseball Reclaimed America". Released in the spring of 1999, feels like it came out 40 years ago … and an extremely funny reread considering how the next 10 years played out. The book is about Lupica, his three sons and how the McGwire/Sosa home run chase helped them love baseball again after the damaging 1994 lockout. It's like reading a 209-page book from 2008 about what an awesome father and husband Tiger Woods is. Poor Lupica had no idea that everyone was juicing. None of us did. You forget how naive we were."

Sorry this 10-year old kid was a "complete moron" in 1998... just like everybody else.

spam and beans

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:55 PM ^

I didn't make a damn cent.  Instead I got cheated.  Players like Alan Trammel, and Sweet Lou might not make the hall because their numbers don't look so good compared to the steroid era.  They are getting cheated worse than me.  As a fan I have gotten cheated twice.  I got cheated with the whole steroid issue, and cheated last night with a blown call. 

MaizeAndBlueWahoo

June 3rd, 2010 at 3:08 PM ^

I don't think he will.  I can't imagine it happening.  And what's funny is that it seems like everyone who wants it overturned thinks it won't happen and everyone who thinks it shouldn't be, thinks it will.

winterblue75

June 3rd, 2010 at 3:11 PM ^

I'm not posting it or linking it, but the headline right now at freep.com says "MLB won't overturn umps blown call". That is so not the case right now, and that is not what Selig said. God, what do they get right?

Njia

June 3rd, 2010 at 3:51 PM ^

Detnews reports the same. It came, I think, from an Associated Press story that said "MLB won't overturn", or words to that effect.

However, in reading the statement, its pretty clear that Selig is reviewing the entire issue, to include the call itself. I didn't read into his statement that there is no chance of him overturning it.

RageCage35

June 3rd, 2010 at 3:13 PM ^

FWIW, The Mad Dog Chris Russo has claimed that Selig is not seriously considering the changing the call.  He claims that a source told him that.

Dark Blue

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:10 PM ^

No it is not a problem and I personally take exception to people like you. The performance last night was a PERFECT GAME, regrardless of what Bud Selig or the rest of MLB has to say about it. That hit was a joke, Jim Joyce admitted he blew the call. Whether or not Bud Selig overturns this , I will always consider it a perfect game. Every other fan of Major League Baseball should do the same.

Dark Blue

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:24 PM ^

Thats the problem with fans like you. The record books indicate that it was a 1 hitter even though everyone in the free world knows it was a perfect game, so obviously it was a 1 hitter. Dude I don't really care what you believe, but in my book This WILL ALWAYS BE A PERFECT GAME. Galarraga did something only 20 other guys have ever done in the history of MLB.

Bryan

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:33 PM ^

Dude I don't really care what you believe, but in my book This WILL ALWAYS BE A PERFECT GAME. 

+1 to anyone that can figure out the flaw in reasoning. 

Really DB, you cannot go back and start challenging every call. What if it were the first batter this happend to and then Galarraga retired the next 27, would that change things? It would be the same result. It was not a perfect game and never will be.

Dark Blue

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:35 PM ^

Fwiw I'm okay with Selig being not willing to overturn the call. I stand by my reasoning however, this was a perfect game. I don't give a crap what Bud Selig, MLB, Drew Sharp or anyone else has to say on the matter. I can overlook record books. I still consider Hank Aaron the Home Run King.

Dark Blue

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:58 PM ^

Im cool with it, I really am. I honest to God wouldn't want Selig to change the call. However I am choosing to remember 6-2-2010 as the Day Armando Galarraga threw a perfect game. I mean that is what happened, Joyce just made a bad call, the world moves on but memories are what we make them.

SCS100

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:21 PM ^

Sports (particularly baseball) are insanely judgemental in that sense, so it doesn't matter what the records say. Barry Bonds holds the record for most home runs, but many people consider Aaron the true champ since he accomplished it without steroids. Manny Ramirez, Jason Giambi, Rafael Palmeiro or Mark McGwire might be considered great players based on their stats, but people don't trust them as much since they basically cheated. Even though this does not sit in the book as a perfect game, many will consider it one based on the circumstances surrounding it.

JeepinBen

June 3rd, 2010 at 4:25 PM ^

Best Baseball-centric reply i've seen on this. No matter what the book says, people will remember that he pitched a great game, handled this situation better than just about anyone could, and in general, was awesome.

The Bonds parallel is perfect - people remember circumstances too, not just numbers

Maximinus Thrax

June 3rd, 2010 at 8:44 PM ^

This game has been up in the headlines of Google news and Bing news, as well as ESPN all day.  Just throwing a perfect game would not have garnered so much press outside of sports specific media.  Despite the fact that some people are divided on whether or not Selig should reverse the call, there seems to be a unanimous opinion that Galaraaga threw a perfect game regardless of whether Selig chooses to acknowledge it. Kind of how like that wasn't yogurt on my sheets Mom