OT - Ann-Arbor ranked as best city for "Life Evaluation"

Submitted by maizedandconfused on March 21st, 2012 at 9:48 AM

So, MSN conducted a survey of the happiest cities, and Ann Arbor apparently scored higher than anywhere else ever invented in "Life Evaluation" which I will take to mean
"I evaluate my life as being awesome because I live in Ann Arbor with Brady Hoke and Di-lithium Smiles. "

Secondly, we were ranked extremely high for a "learning environment".... duh.

Link? Link.

http://health.msn.com/healthy-living/happiness/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100287528

Comments

dothepose

March 21st, 2012 at 10:12 AM ^

Thanks this makes my day. My lease is up in two months and I live in this great city. But I just found out that my work is making me switch offices from Northville to Lansing. There is no way in hell I'm living close to that stink hole. Maybe I can carpool with Rick Snyder...

Dizzo

March 21st, 2012 at 10:59 AM ^

Ann Arbor is #3 and Provo, UT is #4.  I have now lived in Utah for a few years and those two cities could not be any different.  The majority of the Provo residents are Mormon and take their religion very seriously.  Stores and restaurants are closed on Sundays so people can go to church. It is extremely conservative, and you definitely would not see a homosexual couple walking around town displaying affection.  

Obviously well being is different depending on who is polled, but it's interesting to see how people in city #3 would probably not find the same well being in city #4, and vice versa. 

justingoblue

March 21st, 2012 at 11:19 AM ^

It's all based on how residents feel, so I think that would be expected. People choose to be in/around Ann Arbor because they enjoy its..."quirk" (charm to others, but I'll stick with that since it's nothing if not a unique place), while people choose to move to or stay in Utah because they enjoy a different shared experience.

I also think the size of these cities has a lot to do with their residents' perception. None are huge metropolitan areas, but none are tiny and in the middle of nowhere, either. They're all big enough to accommodate different preferences, but still small enough to not have major urban issues.

el segundo

March 21st, 2012 at 1:21 PM ^

It's what newly-minted humanities Ph.Ds from Michigan call the period that they are living in Ann Arbor after graduation, applying to non-tenure track jobs that have 500 other applicants and wondering why they went to grad school in the first place.

(I say that as someone with a humanities Ph.D from Michigan.)