OT: Aaron Hernandez and Urban Meyer

Submitted by Michigantrumpet82 on October 14th, 2018 at 10:01 PM

The Boston Globe Spotlight Team is presenting a series on the background and downfall of Aaron Hernandez. Tonight’s Part 2 focuses on his time at Florida under Urban Meyer. A particularly disturbing dissection of Meyer’s Win-at-All-Costs  modus operandi. Well written and deserving of a read. 

** posting from my phone and only my second OP. Many apologies if I do not embed the link properly. 

https://apps.bostonglobe.com/spotlight/gladiator/florida/?p1=Article_Trending_Most_Viewed

Comments

Blue1972

October 14th, 2018 at 10:44 PM ^

Would also like to add, that given that Urban has no recollection of meeting with the high school principal, he obviously had his selective memory deficit dating back to at least 2006. His wife must be a saint! I would not be surprised if Urban either had part ownership in the drug testing lab, or at least communicated to the lab not to check for masking agents or adulterants, otherwise, no way Hernandez passes the tests. Either way, bet the lab is run by a UF grad.

 

Someone should send this article to Harrison, or better yet, it should be required reading to all parents of Urban's recruiting classes.

NittanyFan

October 14th, 2018 at 11:46 PM ^

This story has been out there for a few years now.

Tebow went out w/ his teammates but didn't drink.  And he had a friendship w/ Hernandez.  I don't see anything wrong with Tebow being there that night.  Hernandez was already a UF student for several months by April 2007 (e.g., this wasn't a recruiting visit). 

I don't know if Tebow "covered" for Hernandez either.  Per the police report, Tebow tried to be a peace-keeper at the bar.  And calling Meyer was probably a good idea: Hernandez was in an incident where the Police were involved and a Head Coach needs to know those things.

That there weren't charges filed?  That's likely where Meyer came in.

mgokev

October 15th, 2018 at 9:52 AM ^

No, not saying there's anything wrong with it. And not saying important details weren't excluded, either. t would be a totally unsurprising and accepted thing if it weren't for Tebow having a very well defined, Christian, wholesome, personal brand.  

This article makes Tebow out to seem like he's taking an underage kid to a skimpy dressed bar and then when Meyer wanted to kick AH off the team, he acquiesced to Tebow's pleas. Made it seem like Tebow spoke out of both sides of his mouth, so to speak.  

All I'm saying is this story paints Tebow in a more negative light than Meyer, which I think is true.

jsquigg

October 15th, 2018 at 12:26 AM ^

Says no one at all.  We all have unique choices to make and make different degrees of wise and unwise choices, but those choices are impacted by circumstance and environment.  Why wouldn't we want to learn what forms and shapes who is thought of as society's worst so we can improve the range of choices we all have going forward?  Sorry if that doesn't gel with your apparent theory of individualized manifest destiny (which is a myth btw).

BeatOSU52

October 14th, 2018 at 11:14 PM ^

The coach later acknowledged that Hernandez did, in fact, fail a single drug test. For the first offense, Florida’s penalty was a one-game suspension and additional testing. A second failure would have cost him six games. After a third, Hernandez would be gone for a year.

It was no surprise Hernandez failed one test, but how did he not fail more? Hernandez smoked so much marijuana he later told his lawyer that at Florida “every time I was on the field I was high on weed.” In a recorded jail call, Hernandez reminisced with his mother about rolling marijuana blunts with his stepfather and two Florida teammates at a Gainesville hotel.

Hard-Baughlls

October 15th, 2018 at 4:21 AM ^

STOP! He runs bible study groups.  He must be a great guy.  

He suffers from multiple physical and psychological disorders (depression, memory loss, heart problems).  The fact that he can keep coaching at such a high level is just a testament to his character and fortitude. 

IE...Dude wins a lot of games so people will create any narrative to keep him around, no matter what a POS he is.

GarMoe

October 14th, 2018 at 11:48 PM ^

What’s troubling about sensationalized articles like this is the use of general, expansive language that, while seemingly directed at bringing attention to a SPECIFIC (arguably) bad actor, ie, Urban Meyer, the broad language actually ends up diluting the allegations to ALL of college football which then results in little if anything actually being done to solve it.  

For example, the authors state, “At the elite level...college football is broken.”  No - elite college football generally is NOT broken.  Elite college football is broken at CERTAIN schools, and within CERTAIN conferences where in others it operates in a much more healthy and supportive environment for the athletes.  Moreover, it should state, “Critics argue that college football tends to be ultimately destructive to the athletes UNDER SPECIFIC PROGRAMS directed by specific bad acting coaches.”  

Dont want to name names, don’t.  Making the more specific language above may trigger certain coaches (ahem, Urban Meyer?) to threaten suit. Fine.  Go for it.  Let’s unpack thru discovery all the dirty little secrets.  Let’s incentivize injured players to come out of the shadows, hidden records to be unsealed and let’s make a show of the case.  No, pieces of excrement like Meyer may puff and bluster but in the end, the risk of exposure far outweighs any slight reward they may feel in trying to defend against a story like this and they won’t sue.

Yes, college football needs to be cleaned up but articles like this with its overly general language casting the entire field of college coaching as corrupt and destructive because of players like Hernandez created by coaches like Meyer, is just flat out wrong.  Put the blame squarely where it should go.

jsquigg

October 15th, 2018 at 12:31 AM ^

Yeah, I disagree.  While there is a range of misbehavior, the college football system as overseen by the NCAA is broken.  This happens at more places than you might think and is enabled by incompetent oversight by the NCAA.  The system also dehumanizes kids by limiting the scope in which they are valued.  We don't want to help kids achieve what's best for them when it comes to big time football, we want them to help our school win and turn more profit to the point where even their degree revolves around that end goal.  Student athletes are limited to those that play sports that only exist in the orbit of mostly football and sometimes basketball.

4godkingandwol…

October 15th, 2018 at 12:52 AM ^

Agree, except for one fine point. The NCAA oversight is not incompetent. It is intensional and corrupt. It is an effective marketing wing to maintain the myth of the student athlete in revenue sports. There are exceptions, but these are driven by schools and individuals. The system itself is built to profit a small subset of individuals. 

Carcajou

October 15th, 2018 at 3:21 AM ^

It's easier for those who aren't college sports fans, and especially  larger cities and their media outlet to self-righteously blame everything on college football and basketball and the fame and money involved. 

Those who don't care for sports resent "jocks" and the attention they receive, and think "all that money" should be spent on libraries instead of glorified gym teachers and football stadiums, as though it were all a zero-sum game.

Meanwhile fans of professional sports (and frankly any kind of entertainment) are glad to point a finger at anything elsewhere that smacks of corruption because it takes the heat off them and makes them feel better more righteous,

Are celebrities of all kinds (including athletes, even college athletes) treated differently from the rest of us? Yes. Will shutting down college football do anything to stop the coddled, entitled mentality of celebrities and the rich (and especially rich celebrities)? No.

Carcajou

October 15th, 2018 at 3:21 AM ^

It's easier for those who aren't college sports fans, and especially  larger cities and their media outlet to self-righteously blame everything on college football and basketball and the fame and money involved. 

Those who don't care for sports resent "jocks" and the attention they receive, and think "all that money" should be spent on libraries instead of glorified gym teachers and football stadiums, as though it were all a zero-sum game.

Meanwhile fans of professional sports (and frankly any kind of entertainment) are glad to point a finger at anything elsewhere that smacks of corruption because it takes the heat off them and makes them feel better more righteous,

Are celebrities of all kinds (including athletes, even college athletes) treated differently from the rest of us? Yes. Will shutting down college football do anything to stop the coddled, entitled mentality of celebrities and the rich (and especially rich celebrities)? No.

Blue Balls Afire

October 14th, 2018 at 11:51 PM ^

"In Gainesville, Hernandez took rudimentary reading and writing courses at a community college, courses that may have helped him but did not count for college credit."

This part of the article most infuriates me.  If we're not going to pay the kids, we can at least educate them and help them earn a legitimate degree.  If anyone needed more evidence that Urban Shit-turd-liar doesn't care about the kids, will say and do anything, and use kids and spit them out merely to reward himself, here it is.

Blue Balls Afire

October 15th, 2018 at 1:12 AM ^

They (we're talking Fla--I don't know about OSU) would if they wanted to keep the kid eligible.  They stuck him at a CC taking remedial classes, which is fine, but he was enrolled at Fla and suited up for Florida's football team, all the while his CC credits didn't count toward his degree.  So they weren't helping him earn a degree at all, just keeping him eligible to play. He should not have been there.  He should have been at E. Mississippi Community College until he could handle Fla academically.

"But his hands were good and he could run fast!"  --Urban Meyer

Carcajou

October 15th, 2018 at 3:56 AM ^

Actually, as the article mentioned several times, that was a kid who should have stayed in high school and enrolled in the fall, or even taken a gap year. He really needed to grow up.

It does call into question the whole early enrollment  game - some kids can probably handle it, but most could do with a little more home cooking and socializing before taking on college and the equivalent of a full-time job like intercollegiate sports. Meyer sells kids on a chance to play early and "the best will play" to get the four and five stars, who are in a hurry to get to the NFL payday, and the younger and dumber and hungrier they, are the better.

But it's also the fault that in our political discussions in America, we have narrowed the definition of the real function of high schools and education. Whereas at one time it was to provide some basic cognitive skills but more importantly, socialization in a civilized society; nowadays they are looked at as functioning for the purposes of test-taking and a step on the employment path, so that employers have to do as little training as necessary.

BlueMk1690

October 15th, 2018 at 2:04 PM ^

I don't think this is specific to UF or Meyer. In fact, it's probably something you could observe at every school playing major college football.

Football players are recruited for football reasons and academic concerns are primarily approached from a 'how do we get this to comply with all the regulations' point of view if the athlete in question could be an academic problem. How many recruits did we have over the years where it wasn't clear if they'd 'qualify' in the end. What do people imagine that means? That they're 4.0 GPA students with some technicalities in the way?

charblue.

October 15th, 2018 at 12:26 AM ^

Outside Columbus, anyone who has followed Meyer's Florida history and the handling of Zach Smith while he was there, now understands his behavior this summer. And it wasn't about following protocol or doing the right thing.

When asked directly whether he had any regrets about his handling of Hernandez, he basically gave the same answer he did when asked in a August press conference about his handling of Smith and allegations that he beat his wife. He thought about it for awhile and then basically regretted that it was a bad situation for all concerned.

He never willingly took responsibility in either case for his role in Hernandez recruitment, the time he spent under his coaching or supervising Smith. In fact, he only did so when accountability was publicly sought. And why, because winning was everything to him, something he is very good at, no doubt.