msu bball uses 11 "student managers" to analyze film

Submitted by sharkhunter on April 1st, 2010 at 9:47 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/01/sports/ncaabasketball/01spartans.html…

I thought "student managers" just hand out water, towels, catch balls under the rim, hold jock straps, etc. Analyzing film is the equivalent of "coaching" activities along the lines of attending coaching meetings (sound familiar?), so isn't there a limitation of # of coaching assistants and their duties? Or is this a way to circumvent the rules? I don't know, just sayin' what's good for the goose should be good for the gander.

Comments

formerlyanonymous

April 1st, 2010 at 10:03 PM ^

I would think there is a difference between scouting and coaching. As long as the student managers are relaying this to the coach for him to coach up the players, I don't see this being wrong. I'm thinking the same grasping at straws at aaamichfan.

PF 34

April 1st, 2010 at 10:13 PM ^

Izzo, like Beilein is known for his in extensive film analysis.. I wouldn't be surprised if we had several team managers who help out with film breakdown. It's a great experience for the kids, maybe they will get a job in the stats department with ESPN or a pro franchise one day.

bronxblue

April 1st, 2010 at 10:20 PM ^

If this opportunity had been presented to me when I was at UM, you best believe I would have signed up for it. If you like sports and want to be intimately involved in it as a career, having experience breaking down film for one of the best coaches in America is immensely valuable. I hate to say it, but this is really a non-issue (I'm also fairly certain that most coaches do this in some capacity).

MaizeAndBlueWahoo

April 1st, 2010 at 10:38 PM ^

Analyzing film is the equivalent of "coaching" activities along the lines of attending coaching meetings

Actually, it's not, which is where you go wrong. I don't think there's any kind of limit on how many people can look at the film. As wile said, they can't interact with the players while they're on the practice court is all.

sharkhunter

April 2nd, 2010 at 12:19 AM ^

it’s vague but seemingly very important.

http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/AMA/RAPIC/June%2009/Coaching%20limits%20…

I’ll belabor this straw grasping this last time because others have successfully done the same to the UM program.

Can a school with a bigger budget have 50 "student managers" analyzing film? How many will a small school like Butler have? The importance lies with the possible escalation of "arms race" for institutions that can afford to hire more staff with more duties.

"coaching activities" are clearly defined by ncaa as

11.7.1.1.1.1 Noncoaching Activities. . . . provided such individuals are not identified as coaches, do not engage in on- or off-field coaching activities (e.g., attending meetings involving coaching activities, analyzing video involving the institution’s or an opponent’s team), and are not involved in any off-campus recruitment of prospective student-athletes or scouting of opponents.

but a “manager” must perform traditional managerial duties (e.g. filling water bottles, laundry, run clock at practice) and if a student they may perform limited on court/on field activities (e.g. "throwing bounce passes, ball shagging, throw batting practice") and they may not provide skill instruction as already stated here. I don’t see or find anywhere or anything that allows student managers to analyze films as that is not an on court/on field activity and has been defined as a "coaching activity." Just saying.

MaizeAndBlueWahoo

April 2nd, 2010 at 7:25 AM ^

Hm. I stand at least semi-corrected. I'd love for any chance to knock the Sparties off the high and mighty horse they've put themselves on over RR's "MAJOR VIOLATIONZ." But it's worth pointing out that at least the first guy mentioned is called a "student manager" by the paper but is actually the video coordinator, which is perfectly legit. I don't know about the rest of them. Maybe they're "student-assistant coaches" that MSU has wiggled into a legal spot in the rules.

Other Chris

April 2nd, 2010 at 9:03 AM ^

... do not engage in on- or off-field coaching activities (e.g., attending meetings involving coaching activities, analyzing video involving the institution’s or an opponent’s team) ...

Frankly, I'm underwhelmed, but if someone is looking to stir up trouble, that article just gave them a big ol' wooden spoon.