Mason Parris upsets national #1 Amar Dhesi 11-4, Michigan Wrestling beats Oregon St. 32-8

Submitted by TheTeamTheTeam… on January 4th, 2019 at 12:47 AM

Pretty good night for the Maize and Blue wrestlers, taking out a decent Oregon State team on a 7 o’clock pacific start time. The 8 points given up were at 125 (3) and 157 (5) where Michigan was without Mattin(125lb) And Pantaleo/Lewan(157) for whatever reason, also missing was Jelani Embree(184). Assad stepped in for a pretty damn good showing against national #3 Ronnie Bresser, losing via decision 6-2.

 

The story of the night however was Mason Parris shedding his redshirt after a 5th place podium finish at The Middlands last weekend to take on National #1 and 2x All American Amar Dhesi. Parris more than held his own scoring four takedowns and adding a riding time point and two escapes late. Shades of Adam Coon nearly 5 years ago when he took out National #1 Gibson from Minnesota. Big things (pun intended) in this kid’s future! Full dual summary below. Traveling so posted on mobile

 

125: Bresser(OSU) dec Assad (Mich) 6-2

133: Micic (Mich) T-Fall Calkins (OSU) 18-2

141: Storr dec Grant Willits (OSU) 14-7

149: Malik Amine (Mich) M-dec Reyes (OSU) 12-4

157: Hunter Willits (OSU) T-Fall Van Anrooy(Mich) 18-3

165: Massa (Mich) T-Fall Olmos (OSU) 16-0

174: Myles Amine(Mich) dec Doyle(OSU) 9-3

184: Hughs (Mich) fall Terry (OSU) 5:42

197: Striggow (Mich) M-dec Coleman(OSU) 14-5

HWT: Parris (Mich) dec Dhesi (OSU) 11-4

Comments

WestQuad

January 4th, 2019 at 9:46 AM ^

Honest question.  For a sport like wrestling where there isn't really a pro league, wouldn't it be better for the athlete to redshirt to get the fifth year of free college/grad school?  Yes you want to compete right away, but an extra year of education and an extra year of "paid" training to get you to the worlds or Olympics would seem to have a lot of value for the athlete.   

Also,  wrestling is interesting in that I don't think you'll ever see a lot of grad transfers.  If you're starting, you don't have a need to transfer because your fate is in your hands.  If you're not starting by your fourth or fifth year, you probably aren't going to start at another big school.  Maybe going to a smaller school or lesser wrestling school.  Curious if transfers have hit wrestling or not.

Alton

January 4th, 2019 at 10:26 AM ^

This isn't exactly my area of expertise, but I do notice that just about every single wrestler on the roster who isn't a superstar ends up being redshirted.  Hardly anybody on the roster is on full scholarship, though--there are only 9.9 scholarships to split up among the team--so being redshirted does involve some extra expense for the athlete.

Given that a wrestler is only capable of wrestling in 1 or 2 weight classes, and a team needs exactly 1 wrestler per weight class, roster management can get pretty complicated for a coach.  So even for those superstar wrestlers, you sometimes see mid-career redshirts for roster management purposes, or because of injury.   Also, teams sometimes identify a single season in the future where they will be able to make a big push for a championship, and use redshirts to get as many top athletes available for the big season as possible.  

The transfer situation is different than it is in the major sports, because minor sport athletes are allowed to transfer at any time without having to sit out a season.  But yes, you hardly ever see transfers in the minor sports.  The only sport where transfers seem to get a little out of hand is baseball.

WestQuad

January 4th, 2019 at 10:43 AM ^

Thanks Alton and Clear Eyes.  I didn't realize that wrestling had limited scholarships.  Is that for all schools or just Michigan?   As a father of a daughter and a decent human being, I generally support title IX, but as a former (HS) wrestler and football player, I think it stinks that wrestling gets cut at so many schools by lazy administrators and that they don't even have scholarships for a full team and/or two deep.  

Random thought:  If college ends up being "free" (funded by taxes) would participation in sports tank at colleges and even in the little leagues where parents are hoping to hit the scholarship lottery?

Alton

January 4th, 2019 at 10:54 AM ^

NCAA rule.  Really in just about every men's sport other than football, basketball, and hockey, and most women's sports too, even the best athletes are on partial scholarships. 

As an example, baseball only has 11.7 scholarships for about 35 players.  Obviously 10 or so are walkons, but it still means that there probably isn't a single NCAA baseball player at any school on full scholarship...other than the multi-sport athletes who play football too.  

rwatson

January 4th, 2019 at 3:05 PM ^

Wrestling is somewhat different when it comes to redshirts as well. Since it is an Olympic sport you see many of the top wrestlers redshirt while they are training for the Olympics/trials. Also, injuries in wrestling often cause a number of redshirts as well, as guys will opt for a redshirt if available rather than wrestle at 80 percent, and instead get completely healthy. The good thing about wrestling is you can redshirt, but still wrestle in the open tournament where you can wrestle unattached to Michigan. 

 

Daddy Wags

January 4th, 2019 at 4:15 AM ^

Parris also knocked of #8 ranked Hilger of Wisconsin at the Midlands last weekend.  My daughter kept telling me before the season what a stud Parris is.  I was figuring a smaller heavyweight as a freshman wouldn’t contribute.  Boy was I wrong!

TheTeamTheTeam…

January 4th, 2019 at 10:47 AM ^

*wrestler not player, you don’t play wrestling.

And I believe Ready was average, IIRC he has a victory over a top 20 opponent this year and without looking would bet he has a decent record but he definitely doesn’t stand out. Wrestling in the B1G is extremely competitive, even the open tournaments Michigan wrestled in usually have 2 or 3 nationally ranked wrestlers in each weight. Parris has without a doubt been the best heavyweight on the roster however high school wrestling is very different than college wrestling, and there is a learning curve. Parris also came in as a former high school 220 so there is always injury concern and weight that needs to be added to preform at 285