Grantland: Dear Jim Harbaugh: Just Go to Michigan

Submitted by mgoblue99 on December 17th, 2014 at 12:21 PM

New article from Grantland.com regarding the Harbaugh situation (apologies if that has been posted already; I searched and did not see that it had been):

 

From the article: "What amount of money makes life in the NFL worth it? He can go to Ann Arbor tomorrow and be a king."

 

http://grantland.com/the-triangle/dear-jim-harbaugh-just-go-to-michigan/

Comments

Moe

December 17th, 2014 at 12:31 PM ^

It sounds like the offer will be maybe more than he would make in the NFL.  He is approaching $8 million a year AND gets to be the king of Ann Arbor.  Seems like a deal you can't pass up to me.

lilpenny1316

December 17th, 2014 at 12:31 PM ^

Secretly Drew Sharp writes under a different name with an obviously different avatar.  This "AnDrew Sharp" makes sense, doesn't write flamebait for his salary and sounds like an enjoyable dinner guest over at the house.  I really hope this "AnDrew Sharp" starts showing up in the FREEP because I may actually read, and link, to his articles.

theguy49503

December 17th, 2014 at 12:37 PM ^

Jimmy would bring in a new era of Michigan football and within 2 years we would be playoff bound if there was a DNA or blue print to a college coach he would be it. Jim seems like a heart guy even though he is very logical and smart he seems like the fact that his home needs him will out weigh the many offers he will get at the end of the NFL season. Jimmy come home son, restore us to our rightful place of College Football Glory.

 

 Sincerly Michigan Fans.

Everyone Murders

December 17th, 2014 at 12:42 PM ^

The article is well-written and makes perfect sense.  The only two variables in the way, by my lights, are (i) how big a part of Jim's ego is it to win a Super Bowl (and will getting Top 5 HC dollars at Michigan overcome the drive to win a Super Bowl), and (ii) how important is it to his family to stay in the Bay Area?

Because he could be confident in having a great life in Ann Arbor, with less pressure than he faces now and more appreciative stakeholders.  He's got a number of attractive choices, but quality of life is a huge one.