Documents show Oregon had major violations

Submitted by MGoStrength on April 16th, 2013 at 10:23 AM

A recent ESPN report notes that Oregon released documents that major violations were committed including failure to monitor violations of the head coach and too many coaches recruiting.  The investigation centerred around Will Lyles who ran the recruiting service.  But, so far there has been no finding of a lack of institutional control.  It makes you wonder if this had anything to do with Kelly's departure...Pete Carroll anyone?

 

Here's a link to the short ESPN video

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/9177148/ncaa-oregon-ducks-agree-major-violations-committed-football-program

Comments

mGrowOld

April 16th, 2013 at 10:30 AM ^

You're wrong there.  The NCAA is sick and tired of being looked at as an impotent and largely powerless organization incapable of metting out justice to offenders.

This time they are mad.  This time they mean business.  I predict that the NCAA is SO upset at what Oregon's been doing that South Florida's going to get their scholly's cut again.

 

maizedandconfused

April 16th, 2013 at 10:37 AM ^

Oregon is one of those programs that catapulted so quickly to the forefront that everyone is suspicious. I understand having top notch facilities due to knight, but to all of a sudden start landing the guys they did makes one wonder.

gwkrlghl

April 16th, 2013 at 11:37 AM ^

Oregon's offense has been pretty killer for a while and they really jumped up there with Dennis Dixon. They've got a sexy offense and sweet Nike-donated faciliites and they still don't recruit that great. Just a few scattered elite skill position players. Ole Miss raised 1000 more eyebrows to me

MGoStrength

April 16th, 2013 at 10:44 AM ^

I just wonder how long they knew because I'd think the knowledge of this report going public had to had something to do with Kelly's departure in the same way I'd assume Carroll's did.  So, my question is, does Oregon have some sort of liability for knowing about the violations but delaying reporting it?  Or did Kelly just know what he did wrong and decide now is a good time to bolt?  If the latter is the case, why now?  These reports were around last year but he never left then, although it seems his NFL interest was greater this year than last.

party like its 1989

April 16th, 2013 at 12:20 PM ^

Sue the crap out of these coaches. Enough is enough. For Kelly to prance away unscathed is ridiculous. Situations like this literally cost schools millions and millions of dollars in lost revenue and smear their reputations.

Of course, situations like with our friends in Ohio are different. They were all in on that one and deserve what they get.

LSAClassOf2000

April 16th, 2013 at 11:11 AM ^

The OregonLive article contains a nice summary of the findings, most of which revolve around the use of recruiting services by Oregon (HERE). If anyone is really curious (I was), the links to the supporting documentation are in here as well - the summary disposition is in the second set of pages (HERE). 

I think the Will Lyles connection has floated around for a while, but the documents mention that Oregon also had more than the permitted number of coaches involved in recruiting and that they also violated contact rules for recruits. It also mentions failure to monitor violations, perhaps not to anyone's shock. 

Anyway, parts of these are blacked out, but you can read the entire narrative on Will Lyles in these documents, including portions of supporting e-mails, some of which originated from inside the walls of the University Of Oregon. 

Tater

April 16th, 2013 at 11:46 AM ^

Is there anyone who hadn't already figured out that Kelly to the NFL was more a product of NCAA investigations than his preference?

snoopblue

April 16th, 2013 at 12:32 PM ^

As long as you appear to take what the NCAA says seriously and enforce some minor penalties, it seems like you would get off without much damage. Miami, even though they got a point because of a garbage investigation, is getting really arrogant in the media and openly discrediting the NCAA, which is not smart. USC was smart in getting rid of their old AD when he started running his mouth and replaced him with Haden who understands how everything works. Shalala and Miami can be pissed at the NCAA behind the scenes, but should to to at least appear to be cooperating with their trainwreck of an investigation. I HATE the NCAA, but I understand that they hold a lot of the power right now. Unfortunately, as messed up and imperfect as the bowl system was, we have effectively given the NCAA MORE power & money with the cfb playoff. With all this expansion and the super conferences, I see a future where the conferences decide that they no longer need the NCAA and will each set up their own governing bodies, contracts, etc. I don't see how the NCAA wins that fight.

oriental andrew

April 16th, 2013 at 12:44 PM ^

relative slap on the wrist.  They talk about major violations, but no institutional lack of control or unethical actions.  They'll get probation and scholarship cuts, at most.  No bowl or TV bans, or forfeiture of games. 

BigBlue02

April 16th, 2013 at 1:25 PM ^

I live in Utah and a friend of mine is good friends with Haloti Ngata. He said it wasn't really a coincidence that the week after he committed to Oregon, most of his family were driving around in nice new SUV's. Oregon has been dirty for quite a while now. I see this going exactly nowhere though. The NCAA will do nothing to stop the Nike cash train that is riding in and out of Oregon

willirwin1778

April 16th, 2013 at 1:59 PM ^

A few years ago we lost some games to Ohio State, Oregon, Penn State and USC.  Is there any other program we played against, during that period of time, that is now on probabtion?

 

 

 

ESNY

April 16th, 2013 at 2:08 PM ^

So their football program pays a fairly large amount of money to a suspect recruiting service which does not deliver the required quarterly reports and has a "mentoring" relationship with several high school players that signed to play at Oregon and that isn't a lack of institutional controls?   If an institution can't determine what tangible benefit they got from spending $25,000 for a recruiting service that is run by a mentor to a number of significant recruits, what the hell would qualify as a lack of control?

ChuckWood

April 16th, 2013 at 3:52 PM ^

I think this will become common.  When a coach runs from a powerhouse program, they usually did something wrong.  At least in the Pac12 this holds true.  

WolvinLA2

April 16th, 2013 at 7:40 PM ^

I disagree with this. Coaches leave powerhouse programs for the NFL all the time, and usually it's because they see it as a better job (which usually pays more) not because they're running from something.  

You know, in order for that to work, the NFL needs to want to hire you too.  So it's not that easy of a plan.  There are tons of coaches who would love to run from their college program to the NFL, even if they don't have anything to run from.

WolvinLA2

April 16th, 2013 at 7:49 PM ^

Although I think you're right, a school like Oregon that's a lot less established than USC or OSU might get knocked back by that slap more than the real big dogs, especially if it means they also stop cheating because of it.  

Oregon has very little football history, they are located in a state with very little local talent and their offensive genius coach just bailed for the NFL.  They have awesome facilities and uniformz (according to some demographic at least) and a very recent stretch of success, but it will take significantly less to knock them off.  OSU and USC are located in areas filled with talented players who grew up dreaming of playing for that school, and are undeterred by the sanctions.  Oregon doesn't have that luxury.  

My point is, if they get some small scholarship reductions and a year or two bowl ban, that could throw them into 8-5 purgatory for a while.