Any Chance of Ojemudia 5th Year?

Submitted by JCV16 on October 12th, 2015 at 10:58 AM

During the NW Broadcast, one of the commentators said Harbaugh told him Michigan was looking into the possibility for Mario getting a 5th year. I thought that was completely impossible since he played in 5 games this year, but I wonder why Harbaugh would even mention it if that's the case. Is there any precedent for someone getting a 5th year in this circumstance? It does look like Mario didn't play much his first year, so maybe that could be factored in?

Comments

Erik_in_Dayton

October 12th, 2015 at 11:01 AM ^

He played in more than 30% of Michigan's games, so he's not eligible for a medical redshirt per the relevant NCAA rule.  Michigan would have to argue for some sort of waiver.

ItsMichiganFer…

October 12th, 2015 at 11:02 AM ^

That's strange because I remember Jim commented the next day after the Maryland game and mentioned how he couldn't get another year to his knowledge.  Not sure if it would be possible but I would say it would be a slim/no chance.

Plankton

October 12th, 2015 at 11:03 AM ^

The possibility of filing for a special waiver which would allow him a 5th year. No idea the likelihood. I'm guessing it's not likely. But Harbaugh. So he'll probably get 2 extra years.

akim

October 12th, 2015 at 11:04 AM ^

NCAA Division I – An athlete must not have participated in more than three contests or 30 percent of their season schedule (whichever is greater) and not after the halfway point of the season (based on the number of contests rather than a particular date).

 

Maybe they're looking into if there's any precedent for getting another year.  I'm sure they could appeal, but at least based on the rule it doesn't seem it is possible.

LSAClassOf2000

October 12th, 2015 at 11:20 AM ^

To add a bit to this, you can extend eligibility per 14.2.1.5.1 in the handbook:

A waiver of the five-year period of eligibility is designed to provide a studentathlete with the opportunity to participate in four seasons of intercollegiate competition within a five-year period. This waiver may be granted, based upon objective evidence, for reasons that are beyond the control of the student-athlete or the institution, which deprive the student-athlete of the opportunity to participate for more than one season in his/her sport within the five-year period.

It also mentions that a committee will review cases that do not meet the requirements and one of the reasons can be medical, but it basically would need to be an incapacitating (or at least long-term) injury, either to the player or someone on the player's family. It also details financial hardship and being the unwitting victim of academic fraud as other valid reasons, but these were just examples, not a comprehensive list. 

readyourguard

October 12th, 2015 at 11:05 AM ^

There is a 30% rule that comes into play.  However, I wonder if Minick & Co. will count the exact number of plays MO played and argue that he technically did not play in 30% of our total number of plays.

Just a complete guess, though.

bluesalt

October 12th, 2015 at 11:05 AM ^

I'd doubt it, but it can't hurt to ask.

Best argument would probably be if we went to the title game. That would mean we'd play in 15 games, and maybe you could argue that since Mario didn't finish his fifth game, he wasn't able to fully compete in 30% of his team's games.

But you hate to see a kid who'd been playing so well have his football career ended so suddenly, so I'll keep my fingers crossed!

MGoblu8

October 12th, 2015 at 11:11 AM ^

Based on the discussion that Sam and Ira had last week, in which they read the rules, it doesn't sound like it. I really hope that it's not the case, but it didn't sound promising.

Moonlight Graham

October 12th, 2015 at 11:11 AM ^

game? Then Utah through Maryland is still only 35%. Shoot. So Utah through HALF of Maryland is only 32%. Poop!

Just really sucks for that young man. I hope there's a way. I can't believe at his size coming in they burned his redshirt his freshman year. 

J.

October 12th, 2015 at 12:06 PM ^

Here's the applicable text from the NCAA bylaw in question (12.8.4: Hardship Waiver, section (c)):

(c) In team sports, the injury or illness occurs when the student-athlete has not participated in more than three contests or dates of competition (whichever is applicable to that sport) or 30 percent (whichever number is greater) of the institution’s scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition in his or her sport. Only scheduled or completed competition against outside participants during the playing season that concludes with the NCAA championship, or, if so designated, during the official NCAA championship playing season in that sport (e.g., spring baseball, fall soccer), shall be countable under this limitation in calculating both the number of contests or dates of competition in which the student-athlete has participated and the number of scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition during that season in the sport. Dates of competition that are exempted (e.g., alumni contests, foreign team in the United States) from the maximum permissible number of contests or dates of competition shall count toward the number of contests or dates in which the student-athlete has participated and the number of scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition in the season, except for scrimmages and exhibition contests that are specifically identified as such in the sport’s Bylaw 17 playing and practice season regulations. Scrimmages and exhibition contests that are not exempted from the maximum permissible number of contests or dates of competition may be excluded from the calculation only if they are identified as such in the sport’s Bylaw 17 playing and practice season regulations;

You then need to continue to read to find 12.8.4.3.6.1, Denominator in Perent Computation, subsection 1 (Team Sports), and subsection 1 of that, Conference Championships:

12.8.4.3.6.1 Denominator in Percent Computation.

12.8.4.3.6.1.1 Team Sports. The denominator in the institution’s percent calculation shall be based on the institution’s number of scheduled or completed varsity contests or dates of competition [see Bylaw 12.8.4-(c)] as computed for playing and practice season purposes in Bylaw 17 for the applicable sport. [Note: Exempted events in Bylaw 17 are included in the percent calculation, except as provided in Bylaw 12.8.4-(c).] An institution participating in a single-elimination event may only count the actual contests in which the institution participates (as opposed to the number of contests scheduled in the event) in determining the number of scheduled or completed contests in the denominator. (Revised: 1/14/97 effective 8/1/97, 2/11/98, 4/26/01 effective 8/1/01, 6/21/01, 8/4/05, 4/24/08, 7/31/14)

12.8.4.3.6.1.1.1 Conference Championships. A conference championship shall be counted as one contest or date of competition in determining the institution’s scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition in that sport, regardless of the number of days or games involved in the championship. However, for purposes of this regulation, the calculation of scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition in a particular season does not include postseason competition conducted after the completion of the institution’s regular-season schedule and conference tournament. (Revised: 1/14/97 effective 8/1/97, 4/26/01 effec- tive 8/1/01, 8/4/05, 7/31/14) 

The rounding up rule is 12.8.4.3.6.2.

Then, you'd want to move on to bylaw 17.10, which is the definition of the length of the football season, wherein it says 12, excluding the conference championship game, bowl game, and national championship game.

So, the way I read it, all of the games played during the season count, because it specifically says that exempt events count in the denominator.  You could even make an argument that the championship game should count even if Michigan isn't in it, since it says "regardless of the number of days or games involved in the championship."  Of course, this being the NCAA, who knows what they'll decide it means.

(By the way, the last page with content in the Division I guidebook is page 391.  I think the fact that there are nearly 400 pages of rules for the NCAA sums up everything that's wrong with the NCAA).

Erik_in_Dayton

October 12th, 2015 at 1:11 PM ^

12.8.4.3.6.1.1.1 seems to say that you can't count a playoff (per what I quote below).  But then bylaw 17.10 does count a playoff a part of the season.  I'm inclined to think 12.8.4.3.6.1.1.1 controls, but my knowledge of it is limited to what you posted.

 

...the calculation of scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition in a particular season does not include postseason competition conducted after the completion of the institution’s regular-season schedule and conference tournament.

 

 

 

ituralde

October 12th, 2015 at 11:12 AM ^

If we make the National Champ game, he'll only have featured in 5 of 15 contests, which would be 33%.  If you count his Maryland game as .5, that gives him 4.5/15 games, or /exactly/ 30%.  

Soulfire21

October 12th, 2015 at 11:36 AM ^

The rule says scheduled contests, which I assume doesn't include the conference championship game nor the CFP, but I could be wrong.

In team sports, the injury or illness occurs when the student-athlete has not participated in more than three contests or dates of competition (whichever is applicable to that sport) or 30 percent (whichever number is greater) of the institution's scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition in his or her sport.

But I say why not try for it?  The worst they can say is no.

Zarniwoop

October 12th, 2015 at 11:12 AM ^

As I recall, there was a kid from MSU back in the late 90s or early 2000s that got a SIXTH year due to outrageously bad injury luck.

Regardless, I'd bet my house that someone in this situation has gotten a 5th year before. The NCAA is nothing if not inconsistent.

jerseyblue

October 12th, 2015 at 11:13 AM ^

You go to the NCAA and say "Why would a wookie, an 8 foot tall wookie want to live on Endor with a bunch of 2 foot tall ewoks? That does not make sense. But more important, you have to ask yourself what does this have to do with Mario Ojemudia? Nothing. It has nothing to do with Mario Ojemudia. It does not make sense. If Chewbacca lives on Endor you must give Mario Ojemudia a redshirt."

J.

October 12th, 2015 at 11:23 AM ^

Actually, if Michigan were to make the Big Ten Championship game, and then a bowl / playoff game thereafter, that would be a minimum of 14 games.  30% of 14 is 4.2, which rounds up to 5.  Mario Ojemduia would be eligible.  I just don't know if the title game counts as a scheduled game; the linked source below doesn't say.  I'd think that it would though.

Note that I would not be the least bit surprised if the National Championship game didn't count, because the NCAA considered it part of a tournament which counts as a single countable event -- the same way the basketball schedule gets abused.

Source: http://mgoblog.com/diaries/medical-redshirt-vs-medical-exemption-overvi… (there's more in the commments, including a link to VT's page which explains the rounding but still has the outdated 20% rule on it:  http://www.athletics.vt.edu/compliance/competition/seasons.html )

 

 

bronxblue

October 12th, 2015 at 11:32 AM ^

It feels unlikely, but why the heck not at least investigate the option.  I get why the rule exists, but it does feel like Mario got kind of screwed in the whole process.  

missoulawolverine

October 12th, 2015 at 11:36 AM ^

Jim will say he has nfl potential and this would impact his life long term. Giving him and extra year of schooling and a rehab..idk..didnt purdue have 6th year qb. Byu guys where like 24..let mario fucken play! Lol

VictorValiant

October 12th, 2015 at 11:53 AM ^

Perhaps the argument for a 5th year could be made on the severity of the injury. An achilles tendon injury recovery could take up to 9 months, which would prevent Ojemudia from showcasing his abilities in front of pro teams until after they have their summer rosters set. Will the NCAA consider what's best for an athlete on a case by case basis? Worth a try. They owe Michigan one for McGary.