Time is a Flat Football: Running Backs

Submitted by MilkSteak on July 23rd, 2015 at 1:08 AM

 

 

"Time is a Flat Football" is a series of posts which will explore players from Michigan football history members of the 2015 team resembles the most. Tackled in these posts will be the offensive "skill" position groups: Quarterbacks, Running Backs, and Receivers/Tight Ends. My apologies go out to the offensive line, but it's very difficult to get o-line statistics, and more difficult to compare the groups. I used Python and Pandas almost exclusively for this quick trip to the past. Any "predictions" can be described as unscientific, but kind of fun.

 

Disclaimer: Obviously caveats do apply here. These are namely the effects of other position groups, coaching, and style of offense on the players being analyzed. Also, the past probably has no bearing on what current players will do, unless you believe Rust Cohle. I plan to deal with these issues by completely ignoring them. It's the off season, people.

 

Michigan has an interesting mix of running backs this year. Junior backs Derrick Green and De'Veon Smith were highly rated coming out of high school, but neither have locked up the feature back role at this point. Drake Johnson is heading into his senior year after a promising junior season which unfortunately ended after a knee injury. Newly eligible Ty Isaac will be a RS sophomore after taking a year off following his transfer from USC. It's a crowded but talented backfield, and at this point, not much separates them. Let's take a look at their stats, gathered from sports-reference.com. Here are their stats throughout the years they have been active.  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
2013 1 Derrick Green 83 270 3.3 2 0 0 0 0 83 270 3.3 2
2013 1 De'Veon Smith 26 117 4.5 0 0 0 0 0 26 117 4.5 0
2013 1 Ty Isaac 40 236 5.9 2 4 57 14.3 0 44 293 6.7 2
2014 2 De'Veon Smith 108 519 4.8 6 3 26 8.7 0 111 545 4.9 6
2014 2 Derrick Green 82 471 5.7 3 2 26 13.0 0 84 497 5.9 3
2014 3 Drake Johnson 60 361 6.0 4 1 11 11.0 0 61 372 6.1 4

 

We can also look at the totals for each player:  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
2014 2 Derrick Green 165 741 4.5 5 0 0 0 0 167 767 4.6 5
2014 2 De'Veon Smith 134 636 4.65 6 0 0 0 0 137 662 4.7 6
2014 3 Drake Johnson 60 361 6 4 1 11 11 0 61 372 6.1 4
2013 1 Ty Isaac 40 236 5.9 2 4 57 14.3 0 44 293 6.7 2

 

  Green and Johnson were each having promising seasons last year before going down with injuries. De'Veon Smith put up a relatively good season, especially considering he spent most of the year splitting carries with Green and Johnson. Isaac's freshman year at USC was good for a freshman back who was not the featured guy. Let's find some comparisons to past Michigan running backs from past years.  

 

Derrick Green

Derrick Green

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
1984 2 Bob Perryman 76 393 5.2 5 2 15 7.5 1 78 408 5.2 6
1991 1 Tyrone Wheatley 86 548 6.4 9 10 90 9.0 0 96 638 6.6 9
2000 1 Chris Perry 77 417 5.4 5 0 0 0 0 77 417 5.4 5
2007 2 Carlos Brown 75 382 5.1 4 0 0 0 0 75 382 5.1 4
2014 2 Derrick Green 82 471 5.7 3 2 26 13.0 0 84 497 5.9 3

 

Derrick Green's sophomore campaign ended after just 6 games, so his stats ended up looking like players coming off the bench. As you can see in the chart above, Green is in good company. Freshmen Tyrone Wheatley and Chris Perry are very similar to sophomore Green. No one on the list is a prolific pass catcher, which makes comparisons easier. Arguably the best metric to judge running backs by is Rush Avg, AKA yards/carry. Let's see who's similar here, and throw in TDs just to compare.

 DGreenComps

 

Green's 5.7 Yds/Carry looks very similar to freshman Chris Perry's 5.4 average. Freshman Tyrone Wheatley's 6.4 Yds/Carry represents the top of the comparisons, and he was much more of a TD vulture than Green has been. Carlos Brown's sophomore campaign looks somewhat similar as well. Let's see how these running backs fared in their next year.  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
1985.0 3.0 Bob Perryman -11.00 -154.0 -1.5 -5 5 61 3.4 -1 -6.00 -93.00 -0.80 -6.0
1992.0 2.0 Tyrone Wheatley 99.00 809.0 0.9 4 3 55 2.2 3 102.00 864.00 1.00 7.0
2001.0 2.0 Chris Perry 35.00 39.0 -1.3 -3 0 0 0 0 41.00 85.00 -1.10 -3.0
2008.0 3.0 Carlos Brown -46.00 -260.0 -0.9 -4 0 0 0 0 -40.00 -237.00 -1.00 -4.0
  2.5 Mean 19.25 108.5 -0.7 -2 4 58 2.8 1 24.25 154.75 -0.48 -1.5

 

Every running back outside of Tyrone Wheatley saw a decrease in their Yds/Carry. The average running back saw an increased workload of about 20 carries, good for an extra 100 yds. Coach Wheatley is really skewing the numbers here. He took the leap from "damn, that guy's good for a freshman" to "damn, that guy's good". This is the type of jump we are hoping for with Green.  

If I had to make one prediction based on this data, I'd say that Green's Yds/Carry will go down this year. Should he win the feature back role, I have no doubt that he'll be relatively consistent. However, the progression for the comparable backs above shows that if you're not Tyrone Wheatley (and most people aren't) you'll come back to earth.  

Bottom Line: Derrick Green should have a season similar to Sophomore Chris Perry (2001).  

  Yr Rk Player Cls Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td
  2001 2 Chris Perry 2 112 456 4.1 2 6 46 7.7 0

 

The 2001 team won 8 games and lost 4. Chris Perry split carries that year with B.J. Askew, who had a good season as well. At this point it's tough to see much separation between all four candidates for the feature back role. Barring a surprise breakout, this should translate to a running back by committee simply for the sake of fresh legs.  

De'Veon Smith

De'Veon Smith, thanks to Maizeandbluenews.com

 

De'Veon Smith is another applicant for the feature back position. In the wake of losing Green to a broken clavicle, Smith saw the most carries on the 2014 team. However, Drake Johnson started stealing carries towards the end of the year before he too went down with an injury. Let's see to whom Smith is most comparable.  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
1984 1 Jamie Morris 118 573 4.9 2 14 131 9.4 0 132 704 5.3 2
1993 2 Ed Davis 93 441 4.7 2 11 89 8.1 0 104 530 5.1 2
1997 1 Anthony Thomas 130 529 4.1 5 21 205 9.8 0 151 734 4.9 5
2001 2 Chris Perry 112 456 4.1 2 6 46 7.7 0 118 502 4.3 2
2008 1 Sam McGuffie 118 486 4.1 3 19 175 9.2 1 137 661 4.8 4
2014 2 De'Veon Smith 108 519 4.8 6 3 26 8.7 0 111 545 4.9 6

 

The comparison which leaps out is Smith's sophomore season to Jamie Morris' freshman season. Attempts and Rush Avg are very similar. Morris was more involved in the passing game than Smith, but their Rec Avgs are similar (Smith's sample size is miniscule, though). Let's explore the similarities graphically because we can! DSmithComps

In addition to Jamie Morris, De'Veon Smith looks a lot like sophomore Ed Davis with more TDs. De'Veon Smith, much like Green, is in good company with the other players included in the comparisons. Chris Perry and Anthony Thomas were eventually drafted in the 1st and 2nd rounds, and Sam McGuffie jumped over multiple guys (a habit he has yet to break). McGuffie left after one year, but let's see how the rest of the guys progressed.  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
1985 2.0 Jamie Morris 79.0 457.0 0.30 1.0 19.00 85.00 -2.90 1.00 98.0 542.0 0.10 2.0
1994 3.0 Ed Davis -13.0 -102.0 -0.50 1.0 -2.00 -53.00 -4.10 0.00 -15.0 -155.0 -0.90 1.0
1998 2.0 Anthony Thomas 16.0 232.0 1.10 7.0 -6.00 -65.00 -0.50 0.00 10.0 167.0 0.70 7.0
2002 3.0 Chris Perry 155.0 654.0 0.10 12.0 8.00 110.00 3.40 0.00 163.0 764.0 0.20 12.0
  2.4 Mean 59.25 310.25 0.25 5.75 4.75 19.25 -1.03 0.25 64.00 329.50 0.03 5.5

 

Most of these players took a major leap forwards in multiple stats. It seems as though once a player has reached a De'Veon Smith level of contribution, the next year they are expected to take on a more significant role in the offense. The average running back got about 60 more carries, 310 more yards, and gained 0.25 more yards/carry. The players most similar to Smith (Morris and Davis) represent opposite trajectories. Morris became the feature back and would keep that role until he graduated. Ed Davis continued to split carries until he graduated.

 

Bottom Line: If he wins the feature back role, De'Veon Smith could have a season similar to Sophomore Jamie Morris (1985).

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
1985 2 Jamie Morris 197 1030 5.2 3 33 216 6.5 1 230 1246 5.4 4

  Morris had a great season by all accounts. Most impressive was his 5.2 yards/carry and the first of three straight 1,000 yd seasons. The 1985 team went 10-1-1 and finished ranked #2 in the country, with Morris being a large part of the offense. Past Wolverines show Smith to be the running back in the most prime position to break out.

Drake Johnson

Drake Johnson, courtesy of CBS

Drake Johnson came on strong last season before going down with a knee injury. By all accounts he's been putting in the work to be ready for this season, and with his vision he is definitely in the hunt for the feature back role. Let's see who Johnson's 2014 season was reminiscent of.  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
1977 2 Roosevelt Smith 57 308 5.4 4 5 46 9.2 0 62 354 5.7 4
1989 3 Allen Jefferson 65 380 5.8 3 3 27 9.0 1 68 407 6.0 4
1992 1 Ed Davis 61 374 6.1 3 3 11 3.7 0 64 385 6.0 3
2007 2 Carlos Brown 75 382 5.1 4 0 0 0 0 75 382 5.1 4
2009 1 Vincent Smith 48 276 5.8 1 10 82 8.2 2 58 358 6.2 3
2010 3 Michael Shaw 75 402 5.4 9 10 75 7.5 0 85 477 5.6 9
2011 3 Vincent Smith 50 298 6.0 2 11 149 13.5 2 61 447 7.3 4
2014 3 Drake Johnson 60 361 6.0 4 1 11 11.0 0 61 372 6.1 4

 

Drake Johnson's profile is similar to just about every change of pace back Michigan has had in recent years, minus the screens. Ed Davis pops up again, and Vincent Smith appears twice. Perennial change of pace backs Carlos Brown and Michael Shaw also appear. The most apt comparison seems to be Ed Davis' freshman campaign, followed by Vincent Smith's junior year. You know the drill: let's look at the progress they made from the comparison season to the next.  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
1978.00 3.00 Roosevelt Smith 41.00 102.00 -1.20 -1.00 4 69.00 3.60 3.00 45.00 171.00 -0.80 2.00
1990.00 4.00 Allen Jefferson -13.00 -111.00 -0.60 3.00 -1 -5.00 2.00 -1.00 -14.00 -116.00 -0.60 2.00
1993.00 2.00 Ed Davis 32.00 67.00 -1.40 -1.00 8 78.00 4.40 0.00 40.00 145.00 -0.90 -1.00
2008.00 3.00 Carlos Brown -46.00 -260.00 -0.90 -4.00 0 0 0 0 -40.00 -237.00 -1.00 -4.00
2010.00 2.00 Vincent Smith 88.00 325.00 -1.40 4.00 5 48.00 0.50 0.00 93.00 373.00 -1.40 4.00
2011.00 4.00 Michael Shaw -44.00 -203.00 1.00 -6.00 -9 -63.00 4.50 0.00 -53.00 -266.00 1.00 -6.00
2012.00 4.00 Vincent Smith -12.00 -204.00 -3.50 0.00 -1 -75.00 -6.10 -1.00 -13.00 -279.00 -3.80 -1.00
  3.14 Mean 6.57 -40.57 -1.14 -0.71 1 8.67 1.48 0.17 8.29 -29.86 -1.07 -0.57

 

The basic gist of this table is that many of these backs have reached their ceiling, and might actually take a step back year-to-year in Rush Avg. While the mean Rush Att and Rush Yd changes are +6.57 and -40.57, respectively, the running backs themselves seem to fall into two categories. The first category includes freshman to sophomore Vincent Smith, freshman to sophomore Ed Davis, and sophomore to junior Roosevelt Smith. Each of these backs saw a significant increase in their carries and a decent uptick in yards. The second group saw just as significant a decrease in usage between years.  

The question of which of these groups Drake Johnson will fall into is difficult to answer. Perhaps the most relevant distinction between these two categories is Class. Most upperclassmen with Drake Johnson level production the previous year saw a decrease in touches the following year. All seniors experienced this decrease, as did junior Carlos Brown, although his decrease was entirely injury related. Only junior Roosevelt Smith did not see lower numbers. The two underclassmen, Ed Davis and young Vincent Smith saw increased usage.  

Bottom line Given that he's going into his ***RS Junior year, I'm most inclined to say Drake Johnson's final year will mirror that of Senior Michael Shaw (2011).  ***Thanks for the correction.

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
2011 4 Michael Shaw 31 199 6.4 3 1 12 12 0 32 211 6.6 3

 

The 2011 went 11-2 and won the Sugar Bowl. Shaw saw a small share of the rushing load with Denard, Fitz Toussaint, and junior Vincent Smith getting more carries. Carries were difficult to come by for Shaw behind these backs, a problem which will also be faced by Johnson.  

Ty Isaac

Ty Isaac, expertly photo shopped by someone here at MGoBlog

 

Ty Isaac is the outside challenger this year. After a decent freshman season with USC, Isaac transferred to Michigan, finally completing the Justin Fargas trade. Isaac's 2013 freshman season was similar to a few familiar names.  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
2006 1 Brandon Minor 42 238 5.7 2 1 9 9.0 0 43 247 5.7 2
2008 1 Michael Shaw 42 215 5.1 0 6 32 5.3 1 48 247 5.1 1
2009 1 Vincent Smith 48 276 5.8 1 10 82 8.2 2 58 358 6.2 3
2013 1 Ty Isaac 40 236 5.9 2 4 57 14.3 0 44 293 6.7 2

 

If you've made it this far, you're acquainted with two of these names already. Freshmen Michael Shaw and Vincent Smith were similar to Isaac in most stats. Brandon Minor's first year was similar to Isaac's in many ways as well. Let's see how the sophomores stack up.  

 

Yr Cls Player Rush Att Rush Yds Rush Avg Rush Td Rec Rec Yds Rec Avg Rec Td Plays Tot Yds Tot Avg Tot TD Tot
2007.00 2 Brandon Minor 48.00 147.00 -1.40 -1.00 2 -8.00 -8.70 0.00 50.00 139.00 -1.50 -1.00
2009.00 2 Michael Shaw 0.00 -30.00 -0.70 2.00 -4 -27.00 -2.80 -1.00 -4.00 -57.00 -0.80 1.00
2010.00 2 Vincent Smith 88.00 325.00 -1.40 4.00 5 48.00 0.50 0.00 93.00 373.00 -1.40 4.00
  2 Mean 45.33 147.33 -1.17 1.67 1 4.33 -3.67 -0.33 46.33 151.67 -1.23 1.33

 

Minor and Smith saw upticks in usage and yards, but all three regressed a little in Yds/Carry. I really do not believe that Isaac will be like one of these guys, simply because I'm pretty convinced he'll get at least a third of the carries.

Bottom Line: No idea. Ty Isaac is a bit of an unknown at this point. Just over 40 touches on a different team is not much to go on. Isaac's his build suggests he'll be more Minor than Smith, but his pass catching ability seems closer to the latter than the former.  

What Does It All Mean?

  I'm not sure that Michigan has a running back on the roster who is ready to be "the guy". Derrick Green and De'Veon Smith have each shown flashes of being able to handle the entire load, and Johnson looked good in limited action last year. Isaac had a promising freshman season at USC, but it's difficult to know just what he is. A look at the Yds/Carry shows reveals strong numbers for each back. RbCurAvg

These numbers are even more impressive when plotted against every Michigan running back with greater than 20 carries since 1975. The x-axis is the Class (1-freshman, 2-sophomore, etc) and the y is Yds/Carry.

curVrEveryoneScatter

The dotted line represents the absolute average Yds/Carry, and all four backs are well above the line. Those with fewer carries are well above the line, but even De'Veon Smith's >100 carry season last year put him above average. It looks like Michigan has at least four solid backs, meaning that at the very least we will have a strong committee. At best we might have the next Chris Perry or Jamie Morris. Just who that might be is impossible to answer at this point.  

Comments

alum96

July 23rd, 2015 at 3:30 AM ^

Didn't realize Drake's ave was 6.0 ypc - pretty impressive considering none of that was App State or Miami OH. (Granted a lot was Indiana!)

I wish you were able to split the history of other backs out just against P5 opponents - I know thats a ton of work so not asking that but it would be a neat apple to apple look.  The reason for that is Green's splits - I looked at it the other day and vs App State/Miami OH he was north of 8.0 ypc (2 games) and vs 4 "normal opponents" he was at 3.6 ypc.   Considering the quality of opponent would have been a lot more like those other 4 the rest of the year I'd imagine his ypc would drop as the year went by as that App State/Miami OH ave would be diluted as each game went by.  As it ended with his injury they accounted for 33% of his games.

Isaac sort of had the same issues in sample size and much of his yardage in garbage time in blowouts but did get more % of carries vs P5 teams.  However most of his yards were vs a 1 (?) win Cal team 2 yrs ago, a rich rod defense, and Fresno State.  Just difficult to read anything into it. 

Johnson had bulk of yds vs Indiana, Maryland and OSU - 1 good, 1 ok, and 1 bad defense.

Smith's non App State yards came mostly vs Northwestern and Minn.  On the surface that would be promising but then so many games he just didnt generate much at all - 3.0 ave v Ind, 3.1 v rutgers...those are not great defenses.  Strange year for him.

I think much like the Shane Morris fans who say we'd have an upside surprise if Morris eventually beats out Jake (as he is a known "floor"), I'd say we'd have an upside surprise if Isaac beats out a healthy Johnson (and everyone else) as those are the "floor".

OL hopefully improves as well helping everyone - I bet almost every back you listed above from history had a much better line than what these rbs suffered thru the last 2 years (yes some improvement last year but its relative to historically bad in 2013). 

MilkSteak

July 23rd, 2015 at 9:20 AM ^

I wish my stats got that specific as well. I'm sure we're seeing a lot of the "UMass effect" for guys in this current group of backs and for guys in the comparison groups. This does kind of help De'Veon Smith's case. A lot of his carries came against tougher defenses and he's still above average. Also as you said, it makes Drake Johnson looks even stronger considering his carries came at the latter half of the schedule.

Hail-Storm

July 23rd, 2015 at 9:55 AM ^

This was an in depth analysis, but I had a hard time with the ypc for Green and how I remember his production.  When you mentioned that he got a lot of his yards against Miami (ntm) and App State, and his numbers against power 5, I think it tells the real story.

I'm still in the crazy thought process that Antonio Whitfield is also going to sneak on the field and make some plays (just not the every down back). 

MGoStrength

July 23rd, 2015 at 12:12 PM ^

Yeah, agree about the opponents, but I also think that's as much about the o-line as it is about the back, and maybe even about the QB.  We didn't have too many games against conference opponents where the QB had strong games to help open up the running game, minus maybe Indiana and he actually did pretty good against OSU, but the rest was a little ugly.

MGoStrength

July 23rd, 2015 at 12:13 PM ^

Drake is by far the best runner we have.  Although he's not big, he's also not undersized.  He's explosive, he has good vision, he doesn't go down easy, and he has a good burst to get through the hole.  I'd love it if he was healthy and was our feature back.  However, I did a post on why I don't think he'll be/remain healthy for an extended amount of time, so I cross him off the list of expected guys.

 

With the Green, Smith, Isaac conversation, I get the impression that we'd be better off having one of them transfer.  I was really excited about Isaac transferring to UM because of his recruitment, but the reality is the backfield is too crowded.  One of them likely leaves after this year IMO.  This seems like a good problem to have, but I think it also makes it difficult for any of them to gain confidence.  It seems like RB is a position where you don't want to think.  You're better off just seeing the field and reacting, and if you never stay in long enough to get in that groove it can be hard.  Personally I'd prefer we have 2 strong candidates that are 1-2 years apart and the rest of the guys are either clearly backups or 3-4 years younger.  I don't think it's good to have 4 guys all expecting to play, someone's not gonna be happy and sharing the carries in both practice and games may take away from all of their development and gelling with the o-line and vice versa.

EGD

July 24th, 2015 at 5:48 PM ^

Thanks for the effort, OP.  Unfortunately I don't think the stats on the RBs are very meaningful.

Based on the eye-test, I personally think Drake looked the best of the guys we had last season and would expect him to be ahead of Smith and Green this fall if his knee is healthy enough.  Smith is really slow, but still a useful between-the-tackles runner.  As for Green, I'm worried about his bust potential at this point; if he doesn't stop going down on first contact and start punishing tacklers, I don't see much of a role for him.  

Mgovideo has a clip with all of Ty Isaac's runs from his freshman year at USC.  It's mostly him tearing up Cal, but he did look pretty good doing it.  He's essentially a junior now, so he should also be much stronger and a more complete player than he was on this film.  Especially with his abilities in the passing game, I think think there's a good shot Isaac begins 2015 as the #1 back--especially if Johnson isn't 100%.

CoverZero

July 24th, 2015 at 6:45 PM ^

Drake Johnson's 6.0 ypc is worth a 1.687 multiple of Derrick Green's 5.7 ypc, because he did it vs. much tougher competition.

I believe Higdon will be in the mix for significant carries this season.

Hail Harbo

July 25th, 2015 at 11:08 AM ^

Freshman Ty Isaac > Freshman Biakabatuka.  Just throwing that out there, Isaac had better freshman stats than Biakabatuka.  Will Isaac have a break out 2nd year like Biakabatuka?  Only time will tell, but if we can compare Derrick Green to Ty Wheatley or Chris Perry, I think it only fair to compare Ty Isaac to T. Biakabatuka.

evenyoubrutus

July 25th, 2015 at 10:20 PM ^

This is the most talented stable of backs (based on their recruitment) that Michigan has had since I can remember; basically the modern recruiting era. With effective coaching and coherent direction on the offensive line someone has to emerge. That sheer odds that all of these guys turn out to be total busts are insanely low.

wolverinebutt

July 27th, 2015 at 12:39 AM ^

I would like to see Smith move to fullback.  He is the slowest of the bunch and seems to run with power.  If he could get into blocking I think it would be a win for the team.  He is just to slow.   

Drake is the only proven back in this bunch to me.  He ran very well when we played good teams.  I hope he comes back strong.

This is the make or break year for Green.  I have not been impressed me.    

Here's to Ty.  We need him to play well running and catching the ball.  If he isn't the real deal it could get ugly.