Body found near missing Ohio State player's residence. [Update]

Submitted by fatman_do on November 30th, 2014 at 4:56 PM

Worst possible news for his friends and family. Body has not been identified. Condolences to the family if that is the missing player.

 

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/11/30/body-found-near-ohio-state.html

 

 

Update: Police confirm body found is Kosta Karageorge. Spokesman says appears to have died of self-inflicted gunshot wound.

angelique @chengelis4m

Missing OSU player. This is so very sad RT @brdispatch: The gun was found in a dumpster with Karageorge.

Comments

Danwillhor

November 30th, 2014 at 8:35 PM ^

but as someone that has had pretty heavy depression for over a decade, it's not crazy. If not for certain people I wouldn't be here today and still have terrible bouts where even in decent times life doesn't seem all that great. No pity party, btw. I tend to feel more empathy than pity when I hear these stories. Anyway, I just can't read the link so I asked if he was, in fact, found in one. If not, due to the osu fan's word of it being a terrible neighborhood, I wonder if two different locations would make self inflicted a bit of a rush to judgement. I simply can't load the links from the app.

fatman_do

November 30th, 2014 at 8:59 PM ^

Unfortunately my friend, the reports are as stated. He was found in a dumpster, and apparently with a firearm in his possession. I was not sure I should have added the thoughts of his life value and such, but I wanted to quantify it from an apparent victim's perspective. My father is a survivor. I know what it is like.

slimj091

November 30th, 2014 at 10:20 PM ^

The killer is that a lot of people with depression, myself included often do not seek help, or even just talk about what they are feeling in the fear that people will just think they are a crybaby. It compounds the already overwhelming feelings of worthlessness, and you sink deeper into a hole.

The longer time goes by the harder and harder it will be for anyone to truely break through the bullshit that has built up in your mind. Pardon my language but depression is an evil motherfucker. It absolutely tears you down on the inside, and hides itself from the people around you.

Danwillhor

November 30th, 2014 at 10:29 PM ^

I'm the same way. By "if not for people" I mean hurting them. I haven't sought help for the typical reasons and so much time has passed that my family doesn't really acknowledge that I'm different/dying inside. It's an evil bitch, for sure. To the other, thanks for clearing up the story and it's a sad thing indeed. Terrible. No worries, I know what you mean and I know you meant nothing bad in any way. It's a terrible story, thing & situation.

DrewGOBLUE

November 30th, 2014 at 8:21 PM ^

I hate hearing this stuff so, so much.

The fact that Kosta felt embarrassed in the first place about suffering from depression and/or other mental complications is a huge problem. Nobody should ever feel ashamed about struggling with such issues.

Moreover, it makes you wonder if OSU has neglected to make efforts to create a culture within their athletic department that encourages players to come forward and get help for behavioral health troubles, and if the appropriate services are readily available to them. This especially goes for football, given that concussions have a high probability of eventually causing psychological problems.

I honestly get annoyed with all the propaganda about breast cancer. Yes, cancer detrimentally affects millions and it's important that people support research to advance treatments. However, when these "awareness" campaigns start turning into marketing gimmicks, I think that's a sign they've become a bit excessive.
IMO, mental illnesses are what truly need the most awareness. For one, they are much more common than a lot of people realize. Yet, most of all, because of the terrible stigma attached. That needs to be erased.

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LSA Aught One

November 30th, 2014 at 8:47 PM ^

One of the hallmarks of depression is guilt. I feel embarrassed to even be alive some days. No matter what anyone tells you, you think they are just saying it to make you feel better. Long term counseling is the only true answer. Even with that, I have to keep vigilant so I don't fall down. I just wish he would have been able to find a path. It gets easier, but it takes a long time.

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DrewGOBLUE

December 1st, 2014 at 1:18 AM ^

I sincerely hope you continue to get better and can eventually make this a thing of the past. Counseling is undoubtedly a necessary part of the recovery process, especially for the many in which medications have no benefit. Something like 1/3 or more people with depression are actually treatment-resistant.

Fortunately, though, there are promising, alternative therapies becoming available. And Michigan seems to be one of the medical centers at the forefront of implementing them ( http://www.depressiontoolkit.org/treatmentoptions/neuromodulation/ ).

CodeBlue82

December 1st, 2014 at 5:31 PM ^

PSA -- As taught by UMMedSchool 
  • Major depression is a life-treatening condition. 
  • The likelihood of effective treatment is high.
  • When firstline treatment with antidepressants and psychotherapy isn't sufficient, there are other effective therapies.
  • If you know someone who is fighting depression, be supportive. If someone talks about suicide, take it seriously, even if they say they were just kidding.

RuebenRileyonRye

December 1st, 2014 at 1:20 AM ^

I've battled depression since my early 20's.  I'm almost 40 now and it's still a struggle.  I even work in the mental health field, so in some minds of people I know I should have it figured out by now.  But, as anyone knows who suffers from any form of mental illness, it's a battle you'll fight your whole life.  The stigma is awful.  In sports, you're suppose to be tough and just push through.  It's been seen as weakness for too long.  I hope you never have to live embarassed.  Keep pushing through.  Counseling and a healthy support system is the long term answer.  I tip my hat to you.

DrewGOBLUE

December 1st, 2014 at 12:51 AM ^

What mackbru said.

By no means was I throwing a jab at OSU, as if it were a foregone conclusion that their medical staff deserves to be criticized for what happened. Rather, I was simply acknowledging the possibility that to best serve their athletes, the mental health services available to them may need to be improved, while also strongly emphasizing that emotional/cognitive troubles are nothing to be ashamed about.

Also, I was not implying that breast cancer isn't a big concern or shouldn't be acknowledged as such. My point was that breast cancer campaigns have essentially become trendy. It's pretty clear the NFL enjoys the publicity aspect that comes from the teams wearing pink and all that stuff.

That said, I think the popularity with advocating for breast cancer awareness might be, to an extent, overshadowing other illness that could use more recognition, such as those related to mental health. For instance, November is actually Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, with purple being the official color. However, I can't think of any major sports franchises that have worn special purple jerseys to promote awareness.

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Zoltanrules

November 30th, 2014 at 9:45 PM ^

was anyone else very uneasy about the relatively small importance this story got (and still is from this posting's time) from the Ohio media, sports boards, OSU and coaching staff in relation to the game and stuff that happened on the field?

I'm sure it may not be different on dozens of other campuses but when you honor someone on Senior Day, who has been missing for days, and then after the game ( I get concentrating on the game) it's just not front and center for everyone, it just seems misguided.

Yes, this is unpleasant, and no he wasn't a star but a human life cruelly ending is 1000 times more important than all the other events this weekend.

 

RuebenRileyonRye

December 1st, 2014 at 1:09 AM ^

I hear what you're saying, but in my opinion this is overall a hard one to wrap your head around.  I mean I never heard of anything close to this happening in any sport on the collegiate level.  It could just be that they were blindsided by it just as much as anyone and from a PR standpoint didn’t know where to go.  I mean there are so many variables to this story – the family, the team, the campus, the police investigation.  This is a tough one so I think maybe they are doing what they can and I’m sure there will be more statements from all levels at OSU as this unfolds.

Seth

November 30th, 2014 at 9:45 PM ^

Just awful. My heart goes out to Ohio State, his teammates and his family. I don't know why this one is getting me so much harder than other bad deaths, perhaps because of the text to his parents. To raise a boy, to have him earn a spot on the Ohio State football team, and then to get that text message followed by that news... It's awful.

The concussion discussion is bound to happen because severe depression is linked, but I would guess no doctor would support jumping to that conclusion. I want to have that discussion and jump to that conclusion anyway because I want to believe that a thing can be done. That there's a pattern we can understand. That sense can be made out of losing a life so worth living.

RuebenRileyonRye

December 1st, 2014 at 1:40 AM ^

This is very sad indeed.  My heart goes out to him and his family.  I think there are a lot of questions that are going to need answering.  The whole thing just doesn't seem right.  It's safe to say most of us have read the articles and speculation and my biggest question is the weird circumstances throughout this thing so far.  Like finding him in a dumpster and how he just up and left with his roommates saying how strange he was acting.  I'm not trying to start conspiracy theories or be disrespectful to him.  I’m just processing it and hope the authorities can get the full picture of what happened.  Especially for the family because it’s never good in the grieving process to not know and wonder if there is more to it. 

My thoughts and prays go out to them.

ED - I did some more reading and I wanted to say that I'm in no way saying there was foul play.  I don't want anyone to read it that way.  I'm just trying to wrap my mind around it still. Again, not what I was trying to say.

DarkWolverine

December 1st, 2014 at 11:05 AM ^

Very Sorry for Him And His Family
In this case, due to the nature of the incident, the press is staying away from the typical witch hunt. But as stated below, questions need to be answered. Shane Morris played one play, handing off to a RB, and calls came for Hoke and Brandon to be fired immediately. Still not clear to me that maybe the fault was with the medical staff since coaches are not making any diagnosis. So, at OSU a guy has obvious concussion symptoms known by himself and his family and friends and likely football staff. He continues to practice and play!! This is a far worse situation than for Morris. OSU has responded so far that their concussion protocols are fine. Surprised there is not more outrage, but perhaps that will come after the family mourns the sad loss of a family member. But, maybe it is all about winning? Just like all the garbage with sexual assault and student manager death that Kelly has survived at ND.

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Urban Warfare

December 1st, 2014 at 11:46 AM ^

He hadn't played in over a month - since before his concussion.  I'd also point out that his family had said they were happy with the treatment Karageorge had received for his most recent concussion- see my link above.  One of OSU's team neurologists, Russell Lonser, also was in charge of the study of Junior Seau's brain before he came to OSU.  http://www.toledoblade.com/Ohio-State/2013/06/27/OSU-going-long-on-conc…

It's a horrible situation, but I'd urge you to refrain from starting a witch hunt before the facts are known.

DrewGOBLUE

December 1st, 2014 at 3:31 PM ^

In a USA Today piece from a few days ago, they reference Kosta Karageorge's sister about the treatment he received. The article states, according to her, that "after each concussion he followed trainers' instructions and received proper care but 'his repercussions from (concussions) have been long-term or delayed.'" Then there's the issued statement by a team doctor in which he said "we
are confident in our medical procedures and policies to return athletes to participation following injury or illness."

It definitely sounds like the OSU medical staff followed the appropriate protocol in the assessment/treatment of potential head trauma with this player, at least in regards to acute symptoms. Yet, the comments from both these individuals make it seem a little suspect as to whether or not Kosta was receiving the comprehensive care necessary for effective management of TBI, which should include monitoring athletes for potential chronic implications that are associated with concussions.

Obviously, there may be additional details to have not yet been disclosed which could make this question moot. Quite frankly though, it seems like a few eyebrows could be raised, at least at the moment.

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HChiti76

December 1st, 2014 at 10:08 PM ^

Just watched an excerpt from Urban Meyer presser. When asked a question re: OSU handling/medical treatment of Karageorge's concussion, Meyer glanced to his right to someone offscreen & said I'm not allowed to answer that. He then made a general statement about OSU having the best medical staff.

Huh? Is this acceptable to the media? Will the Today Show open their show tomorrow with a discussion on how the OSU head coach is not accountable for the health of his players?

It will be interesting to see how this plays out. At the very least, a state supported institution (remember, this is THE Ohio State University) should be required to undergo an independent investigation of what occurred here. A student athlete with an alleged history of concussions has apparently taken his own life. The football program, athletic department and university must be held accountable. They may have taken all the medically appropriate steps. But the public has a right to know. The head coach being instructed not to answer any questions regarding the incident is not a promising first step.