Semi-OT: Toomer Blasts Ray Lewis

Submitted by Everyone Murders on February 1st, 2013 at 8:46 AM

The Detroit News has a short article regarding Amani Toomer's impressions of the Ray Lewis spectacle, labeling Lewis a "caricature".  All in all I think it was good of Toomer to call Lewis out on Lewis's antics.

A theme in Toomer's comments is that in addition to Lewis's checkered past, Lewis is largely all about Ray Lewis and less so about his team.  That jibes with my impression of Lewis.

I am a big believer that people can redeem themselves, but also think that most people who do show contrition and humility.  I haven't seen much of either from Lewis, so I'm hoping he goes out with a thud rather than a bang.*  Lewis strikes me as positively unrepenetant regarding his involvement in the Atlanta murders.

On the other hand, Ed Reed seems to be on the way out of the NFL himself, and has been a model of humility.  Anyway, let's hear your thoughts on this topic since it's the off-season.

"It's definitely all about him," Toomer, a former NFL player whose Giants lost to Lewis and the Ravens in Super Bowl XXXV, told USA Today. "Once a guy goes to the center of the field, goes into the victory formation on the last play of his last home game … I just don't think the Giants or any organization I've ever been a part of, even growing up, would allow somebody to single themselves out like that.

*Insert off-color joke about Lewis's crew's victim going out with a bang. Feel bad because the victims were real and the crime horrendous. Wring hands about dilemma of including this comment. Realize the victims were stabbed rather than shot.  Hang head in shame.

Comments

Mr. Yost

February 1st, 2013 at 9:53 AM ^

But it's only because he truly believes it's what he needs to do to be a positive influence on peoples lives. Particularly kids and young men of his background.

I've met Ray Lewis multiple times...his son played at Lake Mary Prep in Orlando and he was around from time to time.

He's "ON" all the time. It just is who he is because he knows people are watching. I'm sure to a lesser degree he's the same way in his private life.

If that's how he wants to make a positive impact on people...who are we to judge?

Find some else to pick on. Like the guy making anti-gay remarks or the guy drinking and driving.

allezbleu

February 1st, 2013 at 9:54 AM ^

i think he wants to be a leader and i think he cares about his teammates.

with that said im not a fan of his style of look-at-me-rahrahrah style of leadership where it doesn't work if he's not the alpha dog.

to me the kind of leadership i respect comes from guys like his less heralded teammate ed reed who leads by example but isn't afraid to call people out

RoxyMtnHiM

February 1st, 2013 at 10:03 AM ^

This is just me--the product of my biases and experiences--but whenever I encounter someone bleating about god god god, I wonder what they are trying to get away with/cover up/run from/get transferred to their bank account.

Maaly

February 1st, 2013 at 10:09 AM ^

I have no problem with Ray Lewis either, he's a great football player although the religious act annoys the shit out of me, People still talking about something that happened 12 years ago....get over it. If any one of you were caught in the same situation you wouldn't react any differently. You would hire the best lawyer and plead not guilty just the same, 

 

Maaly

February 1st, 2013 at 10:21 AM ^

There's no excuse for murder. But to be honest most people on this board would do the same thing Ray Lewis did when it comes to going to trial. I doubt anyone of you are going to sit on the stand and confess, knowing you are a star athlete making millions of dollars.  

 

Doughboy1917

February 1st, 2013 at 11:29 AM ^

First of all, I doubt most of the posters here would ever be involved in a murder, let alone two. Secondly, you're wrong to doubt that I would tell the truth, all of it, if ever asked about a murder case. If the truth would send me to prison, so be it. I take responsibility for my actions. Always.

BOX House

February 1st, 2013 at 10:16 AM ^

Get over a double homicide? Sorry. I can get over Teo's online love affair, Lance Armstrong's PED use, and Ray Lewis' use of deer antler spray. Those are all acts that at least fall into a moral gray area. Being involved in a double homicide and obstucting justice for the investigation brings morality into question, and it's not going to be dropped.

Louie C

February 1st, 2013 at 10:20 AM ^

I'm sorry but if I had nothing to hide, I would NOT do suspect shit like getting rid of key evidence, and remaining tight lipped to this day about "something that happened twelve years ago." If he's this man of God, then why not show some transparency? That proves the saying "Money talks, bullshit walks" is true. If Ray was a bus driver and couldn't afford a high priced defense team, his ass would be rotting in prison now.

Everyone Murders

February 1st, 2013 at 10:50 AM ^

Terrelle Pryor?  Is that you?  Is this "get over it" stuff basically rehashing the whole "everyone murders, everyone kills ... steals stuff" thing?  I absolutely love that line.

If so, thanks for the user name.  If not, being involved in the murder of two people isn't something some of us can "get over".  Especially when the perpetrator (recall he plead to a lesser charge) has never owned up to the crime other than an out of court settlement to one of the victim's kids.

Different strokes, I guess.

Greatgig

February 1st, 2013 at 12:01 PM ^

I think the point is most people in life, not just this board, wouldn't be 'caught in the same situation' as Ray.  Being involved with a double homicide doesn't usually happen by accident, it's usually the result of a string of either very questionable actions or straight up bad decisions.  I just take issue with the 'you'd do the same thing...' line of thinking.

Blue in Yarmouth

February 1st, 2013 at 12:58 PM ^

People need to get over the fact that a guy may at worst got away with a double murder and at best played a significant role in one...we need to get over that? Who are you to tell people what they need to get over. How about the families of the victims? do they need to get over it too, i mean...its been twelve years. 

I find it absolutely insane that someone would be bothered by the fact that people haven't quite let go of the fact that a very famous person is walking around free when he should likely be in jail. I would find it strangeift anyone  got over that or let it go (as you and a few others seem to have).

 

mGrowOld

February 1st, 2013 at 10:16 AM ^

Common now.  I watch TV a lot and it sure seems to me like Ray is the nicest, friendliest most outgoing,, most community-friendly double-murdered the NFL has to offer.

And he's an ALL-PRO I might add.  Surely when you weigh all his records and accomplishments against a measly double homicide that was SO, SO many years ago there is no way you can equate the two can you?

UofM Die Hard …

February 1st, 2013 at 10:35 AM ^

is an amazing football player, will go down as one of the best LBs ever to play.

 

Do I like him, do I believe him, hello no, he is a shady MF and I think the majority of people know he got away/getting away with a lot of bad bad stuff.  

LSAClassOf2000

February 1st, 2013 at 10:53 AM ^

The USA Today article that some of the quotes in the Detroit New piece come from did have a little more to add to this - (LINK)

This sort of stood out to me:

"Lewis said Wednesday he had an "obligation" to his teammates and the city of Baltimore to "give everybody a fair chance to say their goodbyes."

Now, I could be wrong here, but I believe Lewis himself actually has come to call this playoff run - his final month in the NFL - the "Last Ride", which will apparently culminate in some gathering in Baltimore where the team and city can say goodbye to him, if I am reading the article correctly. It is difficult for me to interpret these things as the actions of someone who doesn't actively seek attention. He will undoubtedly make the Hall Of Fame and he is one of the best LBs ever to play football, but there are so many self-serving aspects to the story he's built around his retirement that it likely is "exhausting", as Toomer pointed out.

Tater

February 1st, 2013 at 12:00 PM ^

I have mixed emotions here, becauase Lewis ratted out his buddies in exchange for a misdemeanor plea, when he very well could have been the person who told his friends to attack the victims in the first place.  Even he "just" told them to beat the victims up, a little bit of contrition would go a long way.  He never gave the families of the victims any closure.

OTOH, Lewis does seem to get a lot of respect from his peers.  If his antics and actions weren't on the NFL's version of the Bell Curve, somebody would have taken out his ACL with a crackback block by now.  Since it hasn't happened, I am going to conclude that the rest of the NFL doesn't see Lewis' antics as anything all that unusual.

As for Toomer, he played for Bo, and is all about "The Team, The Team, The Team."  He got taught how to act like you've been there before and avoid excessive celebrations that put the spotlight on the individual.  From an old school point of reference, Toomer is 100% right.  

 

denards40time

February 1st, 2013 at 1:01 PM ^

Yes, his preachiness can get a bit tiring but at least he's willing to put himself out there like that. For me personally, there is just too much uncertainty to blame Ray for what happened with the double homicide. Maybe because I personally know someone who killed someone in a similar stabbing, I'm not as quick to judge, nor judge as harshly.

BlueInOH

February 1st, 2013 at 1:42 PM ^

"And I'm Tina Fey. And here are tonight's top stories..."

FEY: "Despite being named Super Bowl MVP, controversial linebacker Ray Lewis was rejected by both Disney and Wheaties for their post-Super Bowl ad company's endorsements. However, Lewis did get an endorsement with Double Murder Brand Peanut Butter."

Hardware Sushi

February 1st, 2013 at 2:21 PM ^

From Conan's monologue the other night:

"A super-computer has predicted that the 49ers will the Superbowl on Sunday. When Ray Lewis heard this, he stabbed the computer to death."