No Fly Zone Shirt?

No Fly Zone Shirt?

Submitted by Kokko on February 14th, 2010 at 5:06 PM

**since a few people can't seem to grasp what is going on, Demar Dorsey nicknamed his HS secondary the No Fly Zone then brought that and its accompanying dance to the UA game where we all witnessed the future...or so we hope**

Not sure when the newest shirts are planned to hit the MGoStore, but I thought that I would give it my best shot at designing MGoStores newest hit shirt and what better than one for the No Fly Zone. No I am not an insider, no I have no clue if Demar will wear #9, and yes it would have to wait till numbers are announced to be finalized. Criticism/thoughts welcome.

you can go here for the full size

edit, I also would like an "O Let Do It" somewhere small on the back, sort of like the Jalen Rose shirts.

OT-Second Chances-Dorsey and Hopwood. A Michigan Connection

OT-Second Chances-Dorsey and Hopwood. A Michigan Connection

Submitted by cazzie on February 9th, 2010 at 11:28 AM

Just read this incredible story about a convicted armed bank robber named Hopwood who spends his 10 year sentence in the prison law library and becomes a wildly successful jailhouse lawyer. Now out of the slammer, he is applying to law school at UofM. Turn your life around, lately, Mr. Hopwood, sir? (Demar, you paying attention here? How 'bout you mr. dull?)

Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/09/us/09bar.html?em

Question: Demar Dorsey vs. Regular Students

Question: Demar Dorsey vs. Regular Students

Submitted by Goblue89 on February 5th, 2010 at 12:44 PM

I didn't go to the University of Michigan nor did I apply so I am not familiar with their admission policies/application process/etc. That being said, I was just wondering if an ordinary student with all of the credentials but with a history like Demar's (I use history loosely) would have any trouble getting in the Michiga? Do they do background checks on all applicants?

The reason I ask is because with this whole Dorsey thing, I got to thinking that there has to be some kids with similar pasts that got into Michigan. That didn't have newspaper articles written about them. That went on to do great things.

I understand why this is a story, dude plays football. But one thing I think should be addressed is if the University as a whole accepts ordinary kids with similar backgrounds.

If admissions gives kids second chances, why is it so wrong for Rich Rod to do the same?

One Thread to Rule Them All: Analysis of the Freep article on Dorsey's past

One Thread to Rule Them All: Analysis of the Freep article on Dorsey's past

Submitted by Rasmus on February 5th, 2010 at 12:09 PM
[Note: I have two hours to write this and then I have to go. I won't be back until late tonight. I know it is bad form to put up a diary and then disappear. Note also that this diary is focused on the journalism of the article itself. Others have already done a better job expressing the human side of this story, especially this thread.]

On the surface, the primary Freep article on this topic, A look inside Demar Dorsey’s recruitment to Michigan: What police records show; what U-M’s recruit says (link is to printer-ready version, no ads), is not problematic. It gives Demar a voice, and it lays out most of the facts. Fine.

On closer inspection, however, there are two not-so-hidden agendas in the article that deserve our attention. One is its attempt to defend Drew Sharp by continuing to argue that "Dorsey will be able to play college football … thanks to breaks he has gotten from the law" -- that he received "special consideration from law enforcement authorities" because he was "one of the country's highest-rated defensive backs." The other questionable aspect of the article is in its attempt to portray Rich Rodriguez as being disingenuous in his "wrong place, wrong time" comment. Neither of these gambits holds up under scrutiny.

Let's start with the first, which is a more subtle and pernicious version of Sharp's inflammatory "O.J." claim. One obvious point to be made is that in the summer of 2007, when Demar was still 15, he was not yet "one of the country's highest-rated defensive backs." He hadn't yet played as a sophomore in high-school. The consideration Demar received was the same the juvenile division gives any kid at that age in those circumstances. Maria Schneider, the assistant state attorney in charge, says as much in the article:
We are dealing with kids. The vast majority of kids stop offending. I hope this is one of them. … We try to take juveniles and judge them by the circumstances surrounding them. There are many, many things that can be taken into account.
The facts are clear. Dorsey was twice sent to a diversion program, once as a first-time offender, and once because he confessed to participating in two burglaries on the same day. The police told the second victim about Dorsey's promise as an athlete and asked him what he wanted to happen:
I responded that I didn’t want the guy to get away scot-free because he freaked me out, to be honest about it. … But I didn’t want to screw the kid’s life up forever.
So there you have it -- the victim/witness made the decision. Three older kids were convicted. Two younger kids where not. [I'm assuming that, because the Freep couldn't find a conviction for the other younger kid, there isn't one.] Okay, so there's some room for argument here. Demar's promising future was a factor. Just as it would be with any other kid with extenuating circumstances: high grades, class president, whatever.

However, where the Freep's thesis breaks down entirely is when it comes to the more serious felony armed-robbery charge brought against Demar later, when he was older. First, let me say that this is quite obviously what Rich Rodriguez was referring to when he said "You have to look into why he was in the wrong place at the wrong time." Dorsey was present in a car that was used in a mugging with a pellet gun. Here's what Demar had to say about it:
We was right down here going to my house. We dropped one of our players off, one of our teammates off. When we were dropping them off, they got out the car, tried to rob somebody. I was still in the car.
So what do you think the Freep follows up this quote with? A rational reader would expect a comment on how, yes, indeed, Doresey does seem to have been in the wrong place at the wrong time in this case. But no... Here's what the Freep writers follow the above quote with: "Dorsey’s admissions to police in the … burglaries contrast with the portrait drawn of Dorsey’s actions by Rodriguez." No mention at all of how the armed-robbery incident fits Rod's statement perfectly.

Plus, let's not forget the other big-picture point here. If Dorsey was getting "special consideration" because of his status as a star athlete, how is it that he was arraigned and brought to trial before a jury? If he had done it, he would have been convicted. Indeed, we can surmise that someone else was convicted of the crime from the judge's statement:
The defendants all blamed one another as to who committed the armed robbery. My guess is what it came down to was identification.
Was someone else convicted of this crime? Odd that the Freep would go to press without finding out this simple, verifiable fact. Let's also not forget that there is a jury verdict extant from the trial. It's right here. The verdict says very plainly that Demar has "been acquitted by a jury." I'm not a lawyer, but this document seems to call into question the judge's recollection of dismissing the charge against Dorsey at trial. Funny that the Freep does not mention it.

That's about it, then. The Freep says Demar got a huge break, but he was brought to trial before a jury. That doesn't sound like much of a break to me. Moreover, a judge and/or jury decided that he didn't do it and that he was indeed in "the wrong place at the wrong time." Only someone with an agenda could possibly argue that Rich meant the burglaries, which Demar confessed to, by "the wrong place at the wrong time." The Freep jihad lives on!

Demar Dorsey's transition

Demar Dorsey's transition

Submitted by Jon Benke on February 4th, 2010 at 8:12 PM

Yeah, I know what you're thinking... This is just what we need; another Demar Dorsey thread, though I just wanted to make one quick point, and honestly, I didn't know which of all the threads to put this in... There are two things that should help Demar Dorsey's transition to college; he's away from home and he's with his cousin, who I have yet to hear anything bad about. Of course, the papers and Drew Sharp have yet to even mention this, which isn't much of a shock. Thing is, maybe going to Michigan, being away from it all, will turn out to be the best thing that ever happened to Demar Dorsey.

An Open Letter to Drew Sharp

An Open Letter to Drew Sharp

Submitted by Seth9 on February 4th, 2010 at 1:43 AM

I wrote this open letter to Drew Sharp after listening to Sharp's podcast provided by BlockM. Should he reply, his reply will appear in the comments. Anyway, here it goes:

Mr. Sharp,

I am going to preface my email by telling you that I am a Michigan student and a lifelong Michigan fan, as I feel that it is only fair that you are aware of this before I address the subject of your comments about Demar Dorsey. Furthermore, I will also say that I have no problem with your asking questions about Dorsey’s history to Coach Rodriguez, as that is justifiably part of your job as a reporter. However, I do take issue some of your comments made on your 1130 radio show, having listened to the released podcast.* Also, it is only fair that I inform you that this is an open letter and I will make public your the entirety of your response, if you are so kind as to provide one.

First of all, I question your stance on accepting athletes who have been charged with a crime, but not convicted. As I understand it, Demar Dorsey was acquitted of an armed robbery charge and had charges of burglary against him dismissed. Based on your comments, I assume that you do not believe that athletes who are charged with a crime (or at least, charged with a crime and brought to court), should be allowed to play for the University of Michigan. I take issue with this because it means that any teenager incorrectly charged with a crime is automatically precluded from playing football at Michigan through no fault of his own. As Dorsey was acquitted, and Coach Rodriguez says that he has investigated the matter and believes that he did not commit any crime, I cannot see any moral justification for denying him the opportunity to play football at the University of Michigan. According to your view on how Michigan should conduct itself, Michigan should not accept any player accused of a crime, even if the university believes the player to be innocent, on the basis of upholding a high moral standard. Forgive me, but that seems to be rather disingenuous.

Second of all, I question the journalistic ethics that you have applied when commenting about Demar Dorsey. You compared Dorsey’s acquittal to OJ Simpson’s acquittal without giving any link between the two cases other than the fact that both of them involve football players. Furthermore, you heavily suggested the possibility, and seemed to insinuate that you believe it is likely, that Demar Dorsey was not found guilty because he is a high profile football player. I take issue with this because you did not justify this suspicion with any evidence. You did not discuss any specifics of the Dorsey case, including the evidence that the prosecutors presented in his jury trial. You did not provide any quotes about Dorsey by anyone who knew him. In fact, the only thing that you provided as reason to distrust the Dorsey verdict was a sweeping generalization of football players in the court system, claiming that football players often receive favorable treatment in the justice system. And the only evidence that you provided to back up this generalization was the OJ Simpson case, a heavily publicized trial involving one of the most famous NFL players of all time. Forgive me, but that does not seem to be a fair parallel to a trial involving a high school football player in Fort Lauderdale.

As you consider yourself to be a legitimate journalist, I feel that it is your obligation to provide specific details and a body of evidence to support your view that there is reason to doubt that Dorsey actually committed any crime. If you do not do so, as a journalist it would be unethical to do anything but recant your previous statements and offer an apology to Demar Dorsey.

I look forward to hearing back from you.

*Here is the link to the podcast I listened too, should you wish to hear the entirety of the comments that I am writing to you about:

http://a1135.g.akamai.net/f/1135/18227/1h/cchannel.download.akamai.com/18227/podcast/DETROIT-MI/WDFN-AM/2-3%20demar%20dorsey.mp3?CPROG=PCAST&MARKET=DETROIT-MI&NG_FORMAT=sports&SITE_ID=1128&STATION_ID=WDFN-AM&PCAST_AUTHOR=Detroit_Sports_Talk_1130_AM&PCAST_CAT=Sports&PCAST_TITLE=Shep_%26_Sharp_Podcast

Would Carr have recruited Dorsey?

Would Carr have recruited Dorsey?

Submitted by Dan Man on February 3rd, 2010 at 11:27 PM

I didn't start to follow Michigan recruiting until the last few years, so I ask this question out of curiosity and not to start any bickering. We know that Dorsey had some arrests in his past but apparently was not convicted of anything. Rich Rod talked at his presser, somewhat painfully, about "knowing all the facts," though he declined to respond to the question of whether he believed Dorsey did not commit a crime. Rich Rod also spoke about "being in the wrong place at the wrong time." I guess the gist of the whole thing is that Dorsey probably made some mistakes, which got him in trouble with the law, but probably did not attempt armed robbery or whatever else he was arrested for.

Here is my question for those who have followed Michigan recruiting for longer than I have: did Carr ever recruit kids with dismissed felony charges and whatnot? Does anyone think we are compromising our moral standards for athletic ability? Note that I'm NOT saying that kids do or don't deserve second chances. I'm just wondering whether our recruiting standards are changing and curious to hear what you think...

Demar Dorsey - Under Armor Practice Notes and today's Webb Interview.

Demar Dorsey - Under Armor Practice Notes and today's Webb Interview.

Submitted by backusduo on February 3rd, 2010 at 6:54 PM

I know you all are hungry for more Dorsey info. First is the notes from the Under Armor Practices about him, and then Second his interview with Webb today.
Day1 Quick Hit:
Fellow Sunshine State defensive back Demar Dorsey (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla./Boyd Anderson), a future Gator, displayed equally impressive recovery speed and range, making plays on balls in deep coverage.
Day 2 Practice Review:
Dorsey, Dowling patrolling the secondary
The practice was extremely energetic and spirited, led by two future Gators safeties: Demar Dorsey (Fort Lauderdale, Fla./Boyd Anderson) and Jonathan Dowling (Bradenton, Fla./Southeast). They declared the Black team secondary a "no-fly zone" and backed it up with excellent play on the field. Both players consistently lined up their secondary mates correctly before the snap and showed great range, speed, instincts and ball skills breaking up multiple passes in deep coverage. Additionally, what continues to impress about Dowling is how quickly he gets in and out of his breaks for a taller, longer and more angular defender. These two certainly have earned their five-star billing to this point.

Webb’s Interview today of Demar Dorsey:
Who is faster, D Robinson or D Dorsey? “It has been awhile since we raced and we both won some.” (Then after being pushed) “Yeah I’d probably beat him today!”
When asked about his fastest 100 yard dash – “10.3, but I’m trying to break the record this year.”

OT: My name is pdxwolve and I was a facebook stalker

OT: My name is pdxwolve and I was a facebook stalker

Submitted by pdxwolve on February 2nd, 2010 at 12:35 PM

Yes, I was bored and typed in a friends search of Demar Dorsey yesterday. No, I am not his friend, but I was curious about the kid and I am a recruiting geek, so I took a peek. I promise to never do that again.
Every time this 17-year-old kid does a status update, six million losers from USC, FSU, UF and us launch into a war about why their respective school is the best and why the other school sucks.
I hope this kid is laughing his ass off at all of these people.