OT: Potential Milestone in the Prevention & Treatment of CTE

OT: Potential Milestone in the Prevention & Treatment of CTE

Submitted by DrewGOBLUE on July 16th, 2015 at 7:58 PM
Yesterday, the findings of a study conducted at NYC's Boston's Beth Israel Medical Center on the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like CTE and Alzheimer's were published in Nature (possibly the most prestigious academic journal). Link

This article by ScienceDaily sums it up pretty well. Link

Author Kun Ping Lu, MD, PhD, Chief of the Division of Translational Therapeutics in the Department of Medicine at BIDMC and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), states "Our study shows that an early neurodegenerative process induced by the toxic tau protein can begin just hours after a traumatic brain injury. In both cell models of stress and in mouse models simulating sport- and military-related TBI, the production of this pathogenic protein, called cis P-tau, disrupts normal neurological functioning, spreads to other neurons and leads to widespread neuronal death.

We have developed a potent monoclonal antibody that can prevent the onset of widespread neurodegeneration by identifying and neutralizing this toxic protein and restoring neurons' structural and functional abilities."

Whether or not this research translates into effective interventions, there's still typically the caveat of new treatments taking years to receive FDA approval. Fortunately, though, that's a topic which is receiving some attention -- Kate Upton's Uncle Fred actually proposed a bill to congress that, if passed, would accelerate the process.

OT: I-AA Player had Brain Trauma

OT: I-AA Player had Brain Trauma

Submitted by cheesheadwolverine on September 13th, 2010 at 5:28 PM

It's become clear in recent years that playing professional football is not good for you.  In fact it pretty much kills you.  The average NFL player will die before sixty and lose 2-3 years of life for every year in the NFL and has vastly multiplied chance at having dementia.  Now we have the first evidence, albiet only anecdotal, that college football does esentially the same thing.  A 21-year-old kid named Owen Thomas who played I-AA football at the University of Pennsylvania killed himself last year after what was described as a sudden change in mood and behavior.  He had no prior history of depression.  An autopsy now shows that he had the early stages of a type of dementia caused by trauma from playing football and which is associated with depression. 

There's no way to say that "football killed him" or even contributed to his depression and suicide, but if a 21 year old kid playing second teir college football (who had never had a concussion, by the way) can have brain trauma from football (and as I understand it this is only diagnosed on autopsy, so there is no way to know whether this is the exception or the rule) it suggests to me that football is really not safe at any level past high-school.  As fans who fund college football (and most of us pro football as well) what moral responsiblity do we bear in all of this?